The Battambang Battlers

The things to do in Cambodia’s second-largest city aren’t immediately obvious but, with a good guide, you’ll find the best to see.

Written by Michael Turtle

Michael Turtle is the founder of Time Travel Turtle. He has been a journalist for more than 20 years and has travelled the world full time since 2011.

Michael Turtle is the founder of Time Travel Turtle and has been travelling full time for a decade.

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Things to see around Battambang, Cambodia

Arriving in the Cambodian city of Battambang, the men crowd around the bus door as it opens. Holding signs for nearby hotels, they push each other slightly trying to get a better line of sight to the foreign tourists getting off.

Each of them has a sales pitch – each of them is basically the same. They can take you in their tuk tuk to a good hotel, or a cheap hotel, or one where you’ve already got a reservation.

They don’t really mind where you stay – they just want to give you a ride. And not because they want your money for the trip (it will be pretty short here in Battambang). In fact, many are offering to take you to a hotel for free, even one that won’t give them a commission. They see this as an investment because they know where the bigger prize lies.

“You come with me”, one of the young men half-instructs, half-pleads with me.

“I saw you first. I can take you to good hotel.” He is sweating slightly after running from the other side of the block when he saw the bus pulling up.

Things to do in Battambang, cambodia

I consider my options while I wait for my bag to be unloaded from the bottom of the bus and in the end I go with the guy who claims to have seen me first.

After a bit of a chat with him, I sense that he speaks good English and is friendly enough. Those traits shouldn’t matter for a five minute trip to a hotel but I also know what the bigger prize is.

When I’ve found somewhere to stay, the real pitch (as expected) comes. My tuk tuk driver, whose name turns out to be Yaya, wants to take me on a tour the next day and show me the sights in the area just outside Battambang.

This is Cambodia’s second-largest city and is quite a nice place, based along a river, but the most interesting tourist attractions are a decent drive out of the centre. This is why the tuk tuk trade is so fierce here.

I agree to go on a whole day trip with Yaya tomorrow, something I had already decided when I jumped in with him at the bus station. When I tell him, he does a little jump and hisses an ecstatic “yesss”. I get the feeling he may not have had much work recently.

Things to do in Battambang, cambodia

I’ve found in many parts of Southeast Asia that this is one of the best ways to experience new locations. The tuk tuk or motorbike drivers know these places better than anyone and can explain everything for you. It’s also nice to reward the locals who work hard and make an effort to show you their region and leave you with a good impression.

To show you what I mean, I thought I would share some of the things I saw on my trip around Battambang. If you’re ever heading there yourself, it’s worth getting out of the city and visiting these places.

The Bamboo Train

This is one of the things Battambang is best known for. The small section of Cambodia’s famous Bamboo Train is still being run for tourists, although once it was a cheap and simple transportation system for the locals to move themselves and their goods across the country.

Battambang bamboo train, bamboo railway, Cambodia
Battambang bamboo train, bamboo railway, Cambodia

Banan Temple

About 20 kilometres out of town, Banan Temple is a good example of the Khmer architecture that this region is well known for. It was built in the eleventh century and involves a long climb to the top up a steep staircase. It’s quite small at the top but has great views of the surrounding area.

Things to do in Battambang, cambodia
Things to do in Battambang, cambodia
Things to do in Battambang, cambodia

Phnum Sampov Temple

This temple is much more modern than the one at Banan and is still an active place of worship. But it also involves a tough climb to the top, although the path isn’t as steep and there is a road which a motorbike taxi can take you up, if you prefer.

Things to do in Battambang, cambodia
Things to do in Battambang, cambodia

The Killing Cave

Not far from the Phnum Sampov is the gruesomely-name Killing Cave. The name is quite accurate, though, because this is where the Khmer Rouge dumped thousands of bodies during their murderous regime in the 1970s. The small hole in the cave were used for the bodies of children.

The Khmer Rouge generally brought people here alive and then bashed and hacked them to death before throwing their bodies in the caves. Today, there are shrines with some of the bones recovered from inside.

Things to do in Battambang, cambodia
Things to do in Battambang, cambodia
Things to do in Battambang, cambodia

Grilled rat

Ok, so this isn’t really a ‘sight’ as such but it was an interesting little addition to the tour. You’ll see a few vendors on the side of the road selling a strange-looking snack of grilled rat.

After eating fried tarantulas in Phnom Penh, I wasn’t too keen to try another meal like that so I gave it a miss. I sort of regret that now, though, because I’m curious about how it would have tasted!

Things to do in Battambang, cambodia
Things to do in Battambang, cambodia

Where should you stay in Battambang?

If you’re looking for a cheap backpacker option, try the Ganesha Family Guesthouse, which is in a good location.
A simple budget hotel that is clean and comfortable is Angkor Comfort Hotel.
For a property with a bit of a resort feel out of the city centre, I suggest RaVorn Villa Boutique.
And for a higher budget, there’s a really cool design hotel called Hotel Bric-a-Brac in a great spot.

17 thoughts on “The Battambang Battlers”

  1. Battambang offers a nice change of pace from Siem Reap. Something I cherished was being able to walk around Psar Nath (Central Market) without being bombarded with requests to buy something.

    Reply
    • Yeah, although a fair few tourists go through the place it definitely doesn’t have the same feel as Siem Reap (or Phnom Penh for that matter). There’s plenty to see around the city but it’s also a really nice place just to relax and get to see a bit of local city culture.

      Reply
    • I think choosing a driver can make a huge difference to the experience you have. Most are pretty good but you want to weed out those who don’t really care about whether you have a good time and just want to get some quick cash.

      Reply
  2. I like the competition for tourists at the busses in Asia… it meant I didn’t have to do any research about where to stay before arriving because I could trust they would take me to a good and cheap place, since they wanted my business for a tour later

    Reply
    • I know exactly what you mean. I don’t think I booked a single place when I was travelling through that part of the world. There was always someone who would help you find somewhere that suited what you wanted (they normally expect something in return, but that’s not normally a problem).

      Reply
  3. I saw you post the photo of the grilled rats on your Facebook page and the first thing I thought was “he’d eat fried tarantulas but not try the grilled rat?” I think I’d definitely pick the rat over the tarantulas. I wonder if they would be similar to cuy?

    Reply
  4. I laughed so hard when I read the ‘rat’comment.
    Our tuktukdriver told us that we had to try it…so we did!!
    It tasted like very dry chicken. I would say you havent missed much LOL.
    x

    Reply
  5. I recall this trip vividly Michael. We visited 7 years ago in 2011. Actually rode on the back of a motorbike and it was A-OK. Locals know all the spots and add some tidbits too; definitely the way to go. Pinned and Tweeted.

    Ryan

    Reply
  6. I found Battambang as one of the best places to discover the current Khmer culture. I was lucky to enjoy some festivities in the temples, meet some interesting monks to talk with and be invited to a cremation!

    Reply

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