How to stop the snoring abuse

Read more

Written by Michael Turtle

Michael Turtle is the founder of Time Travel Turtle. He has been a journalist for more than 20 years and has travelled the world full time since 2011.

Michael Turtle is the founder of Time Travel Turtle and has been travelling full time for a decade.

Updated:

There’s no worse feeling in a hostel than the angry stares and frosty greetings I often get in the morning. I volunteer a friendly ‘good morning’ but all that is delivered in return are some grumpy mumblings.

Through bleary eyes, the others in my dorm room seem to seethe with a passive hostility that’s struggling to break out from the cage created by our lack of familiarity.

You see, I’m a snorer.

Without ill intentions or deliberate malice, I manage to disturb the sleep of most people in a dorm room. I’m like a garbage truck collecting the trash, that unwanted alarm clock when you need more precious dozing, or the late night return of your drunken partner.

In fact, if you combine all those things and then play them out constantly through the night, that’s me.

I hear (during my quieter conscious moments) people always complain about snorers. Sometimes friends in the same hostel but different rooms will moan over breakfast about the nocturnal trumpeting fanfares of another traveller while I just sit there and concentrate on my toast while my face turns the same colour as the strawberry jam.

If the conversation topic comes up on the road, it’s normally accompanied by the stories of all in the vicinity who want to share tales of sleepless nights in the presence of what could have passed for a jumbo jet taking off.

“Oh, it sounded like a bear was eating someone did it? How awful for you”, I offer quietly.

Nobody ever feels sorry for the snorer, though. There never seems to be a thought spared for the poor fellow (and, let’s face it, it’s normally a fellow) who goes to sleep each night knowing that he will have created a horde of enemies by the time he awakens.

Never have I met someone in my travels who has volunteered condolences to the man who knows he will arise from his slumber to a room so frosty there would be no need for air- conditioning.

Well, ladies and gentlemen, this is my manifesto and I think it’s time things changed.

I am tired of being the bad guy. (I’m also just generally tired, but that’s quite possibly caused by a sleeping disorder.)

You have no right to be angry if someone snores in your hostel dorm room. You have made a decision to stay in a communal space and you must wear the consequences like the strange smelly hippie in the lower left bunk wears the same thing every day.

You have the option of earplugs or music if things truly bother you that much. (Although, having heard what some travellers consider to be ‘music’ I don’t understand why they wouldn’t prefer the snoring.)

And ultimately there are some things in life you can’t control – taxes, death, your crush on the strange smelly hippie in the lower left bunk… and snoring. This is not a voluntary or a governable action. It’s important you always remember that.

Please, my pleas to you are to not be angry with the snorer in your dorm room, to feel a slight pity for them and to not hold it against them. To snore is human, to forgive divine.

287 thoughts on “How to stop the snoring abuse”

      • Dude.. Having this problem right now. He’s shifting my bricks. His snores are like sonar rays, it’s vibrating everywhere. I’m fucking pissed enough with the smoking, and now the fucking snoring.

        I really don’t want to be the bad guy.

        Please God help me.

        Tried music, but the snore just gets louder and louder.

        Reply
        • Thank you Adrian. The truth hurts, but if you don’t know it and no one will tell you truthfully that their snoring is waking you up night after night, weeks after weeks, and months and etc., which could turn into years and the kind of resentment which can seriously disturb the peace of any relationship and possibly worse given the kind of communication that refuses to admit to unpleasant realities ….

          Why oh why is the option of sleeping in another bed in another room such an extreme, anger-inducing resolution?

          I sincerely do not understand the resistance to this, in my opinion, most logical option. Is it denial on the one part and guilt on the other — the guilt derived from an overly dependent and deep-seated wish to not offend or upset the snoring partner and the denial of the snoring partner just plain narcissism?

          If that is the case, then my only response may sound harsh, but for heaven’s sake they both need to grow up and accept the medically proven fact that ALL people need — yes, need — a good night’s sleep.

        • There should be a dorm with only snorers, because we cannot say snorers not alowed here. You might say that you are sleepy, but it is way better than not sleeping at all for an entire night. We may have made the choice to sleep in a communal room, but did not chose to stay up all night in a communal room while you snorers are sleeping. I may be selfish here, but i know i am not alone, snorers should take an hotel or motel, for the sake of the others, because we too want to sleep at night. When i hear you snoring, i personnaly only think about stabbing you in the throat

        • Sorry, the snorer IS the ‘bad guy’. Just like the smoker in a space of non-smokers. Sure, one can pity the smoker who is addicted and the snorer with the medical condition but they have the responsibility to look after their health and not compromise the health of people around them. Lack of sleep can cause health problems not to mention all kinds of accidents. The snorer should find ways to minimise their snoring, like sleeping on their side, covering their head, and courteously volunteering to allow others to wake him up if their snoring is too loud. This is for his own good as well, as prolonged snoring can be dangerous to the snorer.

  1. I forgive you, mostly because I like your style. However. I still think snorer-friendly dorms would be a nice way to solve the problem on both ends. As a super light sleeper, I can only turn to hostels in a pinch because I absolutely won’t get any sleep – even with earplugs or headphones. If there were snore dorms for heavy sleepers & known snorers, I think we’d all get along in the common area much better =)

    Reply
      • There is something deeply *evil* about snoring. It creates a rift between those who must suffer the loss of precious sleep because of it, and it harms the peace of mind of those whose sleep cannot pass without the occurrence of it, usually marking the depth of their rest. Such an irony that it simultaneously marks the deprivation of the rest of others, to say nothing of the depth of rest they might have gotten.

        It is foul thing, snoring, worse because the snorer is not an infrequent entity, and so it is like a pervasive society within society, unshakable in its membership, notorious among the rest of mankind, yet distributed throughout its ranks, sometimes among those who are loved by those who are not included within its ill-starred fold.

        It is a hideous thing, snoring. It robs people of one of life’s absolute necessities but under the twisted guise of being “a fact of life”. It is not something that is controllable by the snorer, save that he or she is awakened and loses their sleep, and the result of this is only as temporary as it was when first they went to sleep, coming back when once they are back into deep rest. The snorer may be completely unaware that they snore, as well.

        But that is simply not an excuse to demand that others put up with it. What an arrogant and wretched attitude of indifference to what others suffer as a result of your “peculiarity”. It being an unconsciously performed act is no more of an excuse to do nothing about it and to take no responsibility than being unaware of the fact that you have sleepwalked right up to someone else while they are sleeping is something others would feel inclined to “just put up with”, especially if they awoke finding you standing there over them.

        Some people have a problem of talking or having moving fits in their sleep, but at least these aren’t a rhythmic force of horrid noise which saws and gnaws, for hours at a time directly into the sanity of others.

        Frankly, it is another sign of just how pathetic and unseemly is the “God” which made men, and how unworthy of praise. Doubly so, in that some of his lesser specimens have a decidedly special tendency to demand accommodation for their deficiency, a tendency they inherited from their maker’s own arrogance and blindness.

        And fortunately NO, unlike one trollish MONSTER of a snore-beast’s lie about me, I do not *also snore*. But that is just another example of how a double standard is raised high above the heads of the cretinous army of defective beings, who know very well what a shame it is to have such gross imperfections such as would directly gouge and grate into others’ existences, as they demand acceptance for the same, yet realize that it is an implicit stab at another’s sanity to claim they too are one of the damned.

        Reply
        • Soooo, umm yeah. That was quite a statement. Who here is also happy they aren’t rooming with Hitler here? Yikes! Snoring happens sir, cursing “god” or giving something apolcalyptic message doesn’t help the situation. Chilax!

        • What a ridiculous ramble. If you snore, drink less, and seek medical help. If you feel guilt, there is a reason for that. Snoring is disruptive, anti social, and if one is aware of the fact they snore, then selfish at it’s core. I appreciate that I’m fortunate not to be a snorer, but rest assured, the plight of the non-snorer is worse. Earplugs are generally useless against the subsonic rumbling of a snorer, as is often music. A poor nights sleep that could be avoided if the snorer just did something about THEIR problem. Generally I wouldn’t think twice about giving the ‘fellow’ a shake and informing them politely that they’re keeping everyone else in the room up. But what happens if that falls on deaf ears? You can probably tell this is written as I lie painfully close to a snorer. A snorer I will not befriend in the morning.

    • I full heartedly disagree with the premise of this. Snorers are the aggressor and while the problem is a “personal” one is is one being forced on others. The idea that the snorer is a victim to the social consequences of snoring is correct but the idea that it is any different than having, say, a smell that is so bad that it keeps everyone in the dorm awake is incorrect. It’s an issue that needs to be dealt with and you need to work around it.
      I just learned I snore if I drink. So, if I think I’ll be drinking, I book a private room.
      It’s a courtesy to the people around you. Why should their life’s, travel, and sleep suck just because another person wants to be loud as a dump truck being railed by a beachmaster elephant seal

      Reply
      • I’m trying to find out why snorers don’t care about others getting no sleep and why they never warn anyone beforehand! Wow! Well this answers it. Gosh poor you having people upset with you… They got zero sleep and you didn’t warn them or take another room. Wow I don’t get it it. I’m trying to work out if it’s embarrassment or arrogance… Maybe it’s both…

        Reply
        • So you think non-snorers have a right to be there and sleep, but snorers have no right to be there and no right to sleep? How is you excluding someone on purpose better than them excluding someone with something that’s out of their control? You want them to sleep in the street, and get locked up for vagrancy? It can’t be helped. People dont’ choose to snore. You want to exile them because of a physical malady, or expect them to somehow be richer than you to afford a hotel?

      • Common dude, that’s selfish
        We don’t pay for a dorm to heard someone sleep peacefully. I’ll become deaf if I really want to hide the sound with my earphones.
        I feel bad for the snorers, it’s not intentional, but they must have considerations ! Like there’s a big snorer ( who probably has a sleeping disorder like you, which can be cure ) and he was sleeping at 8 pm before everyone ! Don’t play the victim after that jeez.
        Missing goods time of sleeps make me grumpy. You have the sleep ? Let me have the irritation !

        Reply
  2. Michael,

    We forgive you but we’ve also never slept with you. (That prob doesn’t sound right.) At least you’re a great guy during the day. Imagine being an asshole that snored?

    Good luck with this.

    Cheers,

    Larissa and Michael

    Reply
    • Oh, especially when they first wake you up by returning to the room at 2am and slamming the door 😉 because no, I have no intention to listen to your symphony.

      Reply
  3. Though not a snorer myself, or at least I haven’t heard any complains so far (maybe people were nice to me?) But I do forgive you, having seen how a snorer was treated once in a hostel room.

    The guy in the bed beside him threw a soap bar at the snorer to wake him up. When the snorer asked whats wrong, the bar thrower just gave him the finger. I personally knew the snorer and having him say the story with almost tears in his eyes made me feel really bad for him!
    The snorer spend the rest of the trip resorting to the comforts of single rooms (it was on the Camino de Santiago, and there, staying in those albergues with over 50 beds in one room is just a part of the experience…)

    PS It is not usually a dude that is making the noise. I have seen (or heard) some dudettes who were worse than most snorer guys I know!

    Reply
  4. I’ve been told by my other half (and also a highly agitated Canadian who not only shouted at me for snoring throughout the night but also called me a fat b*itch…but that’s another story….) that I snore but it tends to only happen when I’m really really tired and therefore in a kind of semi-coma type of sleep.

    I do think “snorer-only” dorm rooms would be a fantastic idea if I knew I was going to have one of my snoring episodes!

    Reply
      • “Tiny little noises”? Do you think people give you dirty looks the next morning over ‘tiny little noises’? Still wanting to be the victim and look at others as the ‘bad one’s’ — the complaining, rude and unforgiving ones compared to your self-centered lack of empathy and imagination as regards what a lack or absence of sleep for an entire night feels like — emotionally, physically, and mentally? A lack of sleep for one night is a hormonal nightmare — it can turn the kindest person into a cranky, mean, accident-prone zombie. It’s really amazing how persistently oblivious to other peoples’ suffering some snorers can be. Compare that malfunctioning zombie-like human being victim of your snoring to your ’embarrassed, hurt’ but fully rested self-pitying self! Be grateful that you can at least still feel clearly. A person without sleep has emotions and hormones that are all over the place. Please study sleep science, and the many snoring remedies before you write self-absorbed articles like this.

        Reply
  5. I read your article about how you feel being the person that snores, and we hear these complaints from so many people worldwide. Our company has been manufacturing and selling the SnoreMeds mouth guard for the last 7 years and it has a 85% success rate with tongue based snorers.
    If you would like to reduce your snoring and improve your health, can we recommend that you try our product. Visit http://www.snoremeds.com.au

    Reply
    • Good question! Thankfully I’m a heavy sleeper and it doesn’t bother me at all. I actually quite like it when there’s another snorer because I hope it’ll take the pressure off me 🙂

      Reply
  6. Hmmm, I’m not sure Michael. I kind of think I do have a right. How is it fair that you sleep, but the other people don’t? It is a tough problem, but I guess I have to agree with the comments above that there should be a separate soundproof dorm for snorers.

    Reply
    • Thanks Michael for your empathy for those of us who don’t snore. I love that kind of honesty!

      Yet as Vicky and others have said, it’s a problem and the accommodation industry needs to address it. It isn’t fair that the snorer or the snoree should have to pay for another room.

      My husband and I have been sleeping in separate rooms for years now. No lack of love and intimacy and affection.

      Reply
  7. Think you’ve tapped a rich seam here, turtle!

    I know exactly what you’re talking about (I have to buy a new tent for my son this summer because he refuses to sleep in mine).

    My (ex) wife made me pay for some expensive minor surgery in Harley Street to fix my snoring, which it did…. for a couple of years.

    … but, from my perspective, I’m innocent.

    I know nothing of this cruel sleep-stealing monster that others tell me about, so I just feel bemused – innocent *and* guilty.

    Reply
    • Innocent AND guilty – that’s exactly how we all feel. I’m sick of it! If expensive surgery can’t even stop it then what else can we do? Except get a second tent, of course.

      Reply
  8. Hey Michael, great post! I don’t snore, but my sister does. Man, does she ever! She’s the Queen of snoring; she’d make you humble! I dearly love her, nevertheless, and slept with wax ear plugs when we were back-packing in Oz, and I didn’t mind, because, yeah: I too feel that if you are sharing a room with, say, 5 random strangers, you can’t always be lucky and get it your way. But it makes you thankful to the travel gods each freaking time when you do:) By the way: after our first night in Sydney, we stood outside of our hostel, and that nice guy from our room came over and chatted to us, when all of the sudden he turned towards my sister and said: “You know, I really wanted to kill you last night. I had a pillow in my hands and stood beside your bed and was about to choke you. I really was.”, and we were like: “Oh.”. I think he just had to get it off his chest. I’m still friends with him on Facebook:).

    Reply
    • I’m terrified to think about the murder plots that people have concocted while trying to sleep in a dorm room with me. The pillow thing sounds a bit scary! nice that you still stayed friends, though. Hopefully more people will be able to forgive.

      Reply
  9. This is a fun post and it’s interesting to hear the other side. But I disagree with the argument. If you’re a heavy snorer, don’t stay in hostels. It’s flat-out inconsiderate to know you’re going to keep people awake and go ahead and do it anyway. Book a private room if you must. I’m a mild snorer and I shy away from hostels whenever possible for that reason. If money is a major consideration, couchsurf instead!

    Reply
    • I’ve got to respect your view, Scott, but it’s a tricky situation. Not everyone who snores is able to afford a private room every night. Should they be penalised for a medical condition? I think there’s got to be a level of acceptance that not everything is going to be quiet and perfect in a dorm room. This morning people woke me up when they were leaving and packing at 6am. Should they have got a private room instead?

      Reply
      • You tell ’em Turtle. Making us pay more because the snore! These people should buy some bleedin’ earplugs, which, correct me if i’m wrong, are generally less expensive than the cost of a single room.

        If anything, THEY’RE the inconsiderate ones.

        Huray for the common snorer.

        Reply
        • Wow. Reading these comments, it sounds like you snorers are making excuses to make yourselves feel less guilty. I am currently, at this very moment, sleeping underneath a man snoring his brains out. It’s past midnight, this is a scuba resort, and I can’t sleep.

          Some commenters have suggested trying earplugs or headphones. I have both on. I have earplugs in and over ear Bluetooth noise-cancelling headphones over them, with my music turned all the way up.

          How is this fair?! I’m about ready to go sleep outside!

        • Snorers cheer squad…. You’re the type of snorers everyone hates. Arrogant and entitled. Sort yourselves out before inflicting your issues on others.

      • Yeah what about Couchsurfing ?! It’s wayyyyy cheaper than a dorm you know ! Reading you get me annoyed. I want you to be guilty because you KNOW that you have a problem.
        I repeat Couchsurfing… 50 $ a year… We have to make compromise. Because I’m a girl, I don’t do hitchhiking , sad story eh ? I pay more for buses. I could but I don’t. Compromises. Life is not a gift.

        Reply
    • Absolutely, Scott.

      People accept this all too often, or make excuses for it, when it is screamingly obviously that a single room is the answer. That way nobody has to feel awful next day.

      Reply
  10. Oh, how I love this post! Given the nickname “Chainsaw” in college, I’m horribly embarrassed about my snoring. Occasionally, my girlfriends and I have sleepovers (we’re in our 30’s) and I bring earplugs for everyone and segregate myself to the furthermost corner of the room. Thanks for letting me know I’m not alone!

    Reply
  11. Oh man I feel for you! I, for one, have always felt bad for snorers but in my case it’s at campgrounds. I seem to always manage a site right next to one. On my most recent trip I had the added bonus of experiencing a 3 am disgruntled discussion as a teenage daughter kicked her dad out of the tent to sleep in the car because of his snoring.

    But your other commenter has a point. Who’s responsibility is it to acquiesce on their accommodations…the snorer or the snoree? Unlike the noisy early risers or the stinky hippie, it isn’t simply a matter of changing behavior. Yet the argument can be made for both party’s budget considerations.

    No answers on this one. Maybe the snorer could hand out earplugs to his/her fellow travelers within earshot? 😉

    Reply
      • No, it’s not perfect. As many have commented, earplugs do not work with loud snorers. Please speak and listen to more victims of snorers to get a better idea of what they go through instead of making blanket statements about earplugs. Put aside your own hurt feelings and study the actual physiological and neurological suffering and damage that sleep deprivation can cause. It is a lot more serious than your social discomforts — especially when you are not the one who is sleep-deprived.

        Reply
  12. Hey,

    Firstly I wanted to just thank you for posting this article!

    I am in exactly the same boat as you! Second month in to traveling Europe (where you at now!?) and can only afford hostel dorm accommodation..

    I am filled with constant feelings of guilt, shame and embarrassment and every night I struggle to try to get to sleep as my mind is constantly racing either telling myself to sleep on my side or trying some new anti-snore spray I found in the last city I visited. In fact, I found this website from googling ‘Hostel Dorms How can I stop snoring’ haha..

    I completely understand how other travelers feel, I’ve been kept up by drunken late night arrivals, 4am showers and bad snorers too! But I hate the awkwardness and the way people hate you the next day.

    Cheers for this Michael, I guess until these separate dorms are created I will resort to the earplug offering option.

    J.

    Reply
  13. I’m writing this post at 4am from a hostel toilet. Ive never had any problems up until now with snorers in hostels, but this one guy in my room, Jesus fuck I have never in my entire life experienced something so bad. I had earplugs fully in, with canned headphones on top, music too loud to sleep, and I could STILL hear him. It’s easy for you to say “just forgive the snorer” when it’s you that gets a full night sleep, while everyone else gets kept awake. Is it really fair for 1 snorer to keep 5 other people awake for an entire night? Packing at 6am is different, you at least get to sleep most of the night, deal with a bit of noise, then go back to sleep. To miss out on an entire night of sleep, it’s pretty terrible. Why don’t you try it? Get yourself really tired, ready for a good nights sleep. Then download a soundtrack of a snorer, play it really loud, and keep yourself awake ALL night. Imagine that was a person who was in your dorm, who was well aware of what they were doing. Put yourself in our shoes and see what it’s like. Snoring may be involuntary, but sleeping in a hostel when you know your snoring is bad enough to keep people awake? That’s you making the decision to prevent 5 people from getting a good nights sleep because you don’t want to deal with the fact you have a snoring problem.

    Reply
    • Good points! I do think it’s important to think about it from other people’s perspectives. It sure sounds like you had a pretty hellish night. Something for me to think about… thanks.

      Reply
    • Six years later, 4 a.m. again. I agree with this guy. Sorry that you snorers have to endure a life of bullying and overly respectful online conversations. But seriously, if you snore, don’t go into hostels. Just don’t. Choosing to do that regardless makes you appear like an asshole, and rightfully so. I know, hostels are great, cheap, social etc., and you don’t want to miss out on the experience. But keeping 7 people awake all night is a selfish act, no matter how unfair life has been to you who snore otherwise. I feel sincerely sorry for the difficulties that come with being a snorer. I also detest people who bitch behind someone’s back and can’t talk straight to their face, behaving like a bunch of horrific hairless monkeys in a place designed to provide connectedness (and revenue). But choosing to stay in a hostel is not a human right. Sleep is. Please spread the word. I don’t understand at all why this is not crystal clear to some people. I’m not talking about bullying anyone, or some poetic “cold stares”. It’s the choice you made sleeping in the same room as 7 strangers. It’s disrespectful, and this is not an opinion to be discussed but a fact. Even if you are on a low budget – and single rooms are naturally expensive – I still can’t agree with the implication that a single person’s sleep is more important than that of seven others. Also, I just lost 20 bucks of my own low budget. That’s 140 bucks paid in total for zero sleep. Really makes me buthurt, no offense, just good old, plain righteous anger. Namaste

      Reply
    • Good post.
      Author’s reply: “I do think it’s important to think about it from other people’s perspectives. It sure sounds like you had a pretty hellish night. Something for me to think about… thanks.”
      Which means — he never thought about it before !! A typical snorer who is oblivious to others’ suffering.
      The snorer is NOT the victim, as the article wants to propose. The abuse is originally from the snorer. People get mad at the snorer because people get mad at abusers.
      A snorer who decides to sleep in a dorm room, is like a person who decides to play music full blast all night in a dorm room. The effect is the same. And the culpability is the same. Snorers should start accepting that as fact and stop being in denial and pitying themselves. And it would be good for hostels to see this as well.
      If you have a problem with your bladder or digestive system and you stink up a room because you can’t control it, then you must never stay in a dorm room, simple as that. A snoring problem is the same.

      Reply
  14. Hello,

    I too am having this problem and would like to ask you a question. If the snorer is not aware that their snoring is horrendously loud how do you approach them about coming to a possible resolution (and I have traveled – there are different degrees of loudness)? For example they are a girl and “would not believe that they (a girl) would snore at all” – let alone two of them in the same room going at it.

    Really I am absolutely throwing everything I have at this issue in terms of empathy, tact and ‘conflict resolution’ but to no avail. I just want to know what would you find least offensive in terms of a direct “is there something we can do about this” approach.

    It would not be such a problem only I am sharing with them long term and am not sure there is a viable solution in the works. Given that I am not going to get hostile or expect them to magically stop snoring.

    Thanks,

    Donna

    Reply
    • Hi Donna,
      A very good question! It definitely sounds like something you need to address if you’re going to be spending a lot of time with them. But there’s an issue about whether by telling someone, you actually make the situation any better.
      I have had people I’m sharing with tell me that I snore. But it doesn’t mean I can stop it. It just means that I feel bad and guilty for any potential disturbance I’m causing. But, at the same time, it does let me try different things to make it better and sometimes they work.
      If I could offer any advice, it would be to bring it up in a way that helps them understand how difficult it makes it for you to sleep and how nice they would be if they tried some methods to alleviate the snoring.
      Hope that helps!

      Reply
      • The fact that a snorer feels guilty and bad about their snoring means that they already know how difficult it is for others to sleep when they are in the room. There is no need to have to explain this. It is incumbent on the snorer to be aware of their condition and its effects on others’ health. They ought to know this as fact; people don’t need to walk on eggshells for their sake — the suffering of the sleep-deprived is greater than the snorer’s feelings of guilt.
        “. . .there’s an issue about whether by telling someone, you actually make the situation any better.” >> Oh you mean if the snorer feels “bad and guilty”, it won’t make the situation any better? You mean, he’ll just end up snoring even more loudly the next time? Or he will be forced too get a single room or go somewhere else? Is this about the snorer’s feelings and situation again?
        It’s interesting that the article and comments of the author are consistently revealing that character flaw of selfishness and self-absorption that snorers who sleep in dorm rooms have.

        Reply
      • I love how you say you can’t help your snoring, but yet you haven’t tried basic things you can do to prevent yourself from tormenting everyone else.

        I’m mortified and ashamed of my snoring which is a great thing because snoring is absolutely disgusting. So I got an app on my phone to track my sleep habits, including when I snore. I found a spray to clear up my sinuses and through that I was able to reduce my snoring to an average of 3 minutes per week, which is still gross but not enough to make a judge decide “not guilty” if someone tried to kill me over my snoring.

        If you try all the products on the market and none of them work, there is still an app you can get on your phone that will wake you up whenever you snore.

        Honestly it sounds like you’re not trying all that hard bc you’re not the one loosing sleep.

        The fact of the matter is that everything you do IS your responsibility. There are solutions to every problem and if you’re keeping other people awake due to your snoring that’s absolutely your fault and it’s your responsibility to change it.

        Reply
        • Thank you for this post.
          Interesting how the author doesn’t respond to this thoughtful and informative post. He doesn’t want to take responsibility.
          He insists on being the victim when he is the victimizer. He lacks empathy.

  15. If all those who snore please come with me this lovely cage, we will feed you and make you work hard, all day. Then we will kill you all my little snoring friends. Goodnight.

    Reply
  16. haha good one actually, to be honest I have never put myself in the shoes of a loud snorer, but it never really did bother me too. like you say if I chose to stay in a dorm, I would certainly put on my trusty ear plugs and retreat into my own world. if there is a dorm for snorers it would make everyone happy don’t you think, snorer or light sleepers! if we use an earplugs, maybe you can try using some things to help alleviate your snoring? just a thought. in life and travels, we are all learning tolerance and compaasion 😉

    Reply
  17. I’m writing this from a hostel in Buenos Aires at five in the morning having been woken up by two snorers in my eight person dorm room. I do feel slight sympathy for the snorer, however I find it an inherantly selfish act to chose to sleep in a dorm room with the knowledge that your snoring is capable of disturbing sometimes up to five other people’s sleep. It is difficult given that staying in private accommodation would be significantly more expensive for the one snorer but I think said snorer has to accept that it’s not fair to potentially ruin a peron’s travelling or holidaying experience. For example I am here in Buenos Aires for only four nights as it is an expensive place to stay. So, it is upsetting to have to waste some of my precious time in this lovely city having to sleep in the middle of the day, or failing that not being able to go out at night because of fatigue.

    Reply
    • Yeah, I hear you, James. This is the great dilemma of the snoring situation. It’s nobody’s ‘fault’ as such, in that the snorer can’t control it. But somebody has to make a sacrifice – either the snorer paying more for a private room or the other people wearing earplugs or feeling tired. Unfortunately there is no easy solution. I suppose all I wanted to do with this piece was raise the point that the snorer suffers too – they know what they are doing to the other people…
      I hope your stay in BA got better.

      Reply
    • People with medical conditions do have extra expenses and accept that reality. Like people using wheelchairs will travel less or always book single rooms. The problem with many snorers is that they are not taking responsibility and are generally inconsiderate of others. Hostels have to take the lead, if snorers will not. And customers should probably demand it.

      Reply
      • Sonnie, maybe if this bothers you so much, you should get a single room knowing this. That way others don’t need to deal with all your whining? You know the forms are shared, want to exclude some them get your own room. BTW, ada- people with disabilities do not have extra expenditures.. they have government required assistance that does not cost.
        That said, it should be that the snores takes precautions, and we should also just wake them up nicely…. that way neither get full sleep, lol

        Reply
  18. I’m currently in a room with a snorer and i feel its their duty to accept that they have a problem and make accomadations where they don’t ruin 5-8 other peoples nights to save a buck or two.

    Reply
  19. I think the comparison to someone leaving early is unfair. They’ll probably disturb you for 30 min tops. Same thing with a drunk person or someone having sex. Snorers have the power to rob a room of an entire night’s sleep.

    I would suggest that a more accurate comparison would be to someone who requires loud music to be played from speakers in order to sleep. While I would sympathize with them, I would tell them that a dorm room is not the place for them.

    At the very least, please warn the others BEFORE you go to bed so I can acquire some earplugs (even better, bring some extras with you for those without). If you don’t warn me and I lose an entire night’s sleep to you, don’t be surprised if I’m frosty in the morning.

    Reply
  20. It’s hilarious how many people are commenting whilst being kept awake in hostels! I am in Prague and have three snorers surrounding me as we speak. It’s 5am and I haven’t slept yet.

    Of course snorers can’t help the fact that they make noise at night. However, you can hardly be surprised at the frosty reception. I’ll probably have to spend my day napping whilst the hostel sound system checks out Prague Castle. Still think it’s worse for the snorer?

    Reply
    • Everyone has different needs, different routines, and different sleeping patterns in hostels. That’s why there can be so many different issues. I think the key here is to minimise disturbances as much as possible but accept that some things are unavoidable. In your situation, listening to the radio with headphones would work, wouldn’t it?

      Reply
  21. I feel for you, man. I was traveling in Southeast Asia, and I also experienced the rudeness of my roommates in a couple of hostels where I stayed in. I snore, too, and I have to agree with you that everyone staying in a hostel should expect snorers. They can’t choose the people that they share the room with. Just the same, they can’t tell a crippled person to stay away from using the sidewalk because they’re slowing people down. It’s not like we choose to snore. Nobody wants to bother anybody. And to that woman in Kuala Lumpur who told me to stay in a hotel instead, don’t tell me what to do. I prefer staying at a hostel because it’s cheaper, and that is my choice as I travel alone. But you’re traveling in a group, so that means it should be more affordable for you to share a fancy room. Expect the unexpected when sharing a common area.

    Reply
    • Thanks, mate. It’s nice to have some support on this. A lot of people seem to think that us snorers should be pariahs when it comes to accommodation. I guess it’s hard to know what it’s like on the other hand. I have definitely slept in rooms where people snore a lot worse than me and I just put up with it. But I am quite a heavy sleeper…

      Reply
    • There’s a woman here in the room that I’m in and she slept like a pig- loud snoring with many horrendous snorts.
      One of the other girls in the room tried to hint to her that her snoring had kept EVERYONE in that room awake that previous night and she rudely said “go and get a private room if my snoring is distracting you”.
      We couldn’t believe her cheek.
      I am a mild snorer myself however my friend says I should just try to blow my nose properly at night and hoik out all the phlegm from my throat and that’ll make me quieter. Though she said it’s more heavy breathing than snoring. It was just one night she thought she could hear one huge snot bogey dancing up and down my nose canal.
      Anyway I clear both my nose and throat each night to the best of my ability especially if I am staying over someplace else as the thought of keeping others awake horrifies me.
      We need our sleep. We can’t function fully without it.
      There are those who are maybe not quite as well aware of their loud snoring as the woman we encountered but still know it causes ill sleep for others yet they’ll just go along as if nothing was wrong. They should seek help in one of those anti-snore devices (my sister swears hers was a marriage saver) or book a separate single room.

      Reply
    • Disagree with this. If you are endangering people by causing them to be sleep-deprived, you have to be told.
      Slowing down on a sidewalk is very different from being accident-prone because you didn’t get a full night’s sleep. Some of those dorm-mates may need to drive the next day and their lack of sleep because of your irresponsibility could could result in someone’s death.
      You don’t choose to snore, but you can choose not to hurt others with your snoring.

      Reply
  22. Your problem makes people cry. In my opinion, it is quite selfish. In the political views, people lives well without problems. Snoring makes others terrible situations, it is a problem. But you said it is nature! And everybody must be sacrifce and understand. Is that not too much?

    If you love to share spaces, there are suggestions for sharing hearts. Some snorers give earplugs to mates first, never ask people to buy themselves. It is similar to a responsiblity to public, like keep a road clean after walking the dog, right?

    Ps, I am trying to be patient with snoring mate down to me.

    Reply
  23. I know you cant help it but you know what could help…. Tell the people you snore so they can go buy earplugs or whatever instead of waking up in the night…. Just because you warned them they’ll br friendlier. Unlike the guy i’m lying in the room with right now….!!!

    Reply
  24. NO…screw the apology. Snoring is your problem. Probably because you are FAT/obese or something else wrong with you. If you are a fatty. Freaking stop eating so much. With chicks its mostly cause of all the fat. Guys its about 60/40 fat skinny. Earplugs dont help. Music? Drown out snoring with more loud noise? Yeah no. How bout you try every thing YOU can possibly try or do to stop. When i hear snoring i hope the person stops breathing and dies. Especially if they have sleep apnea and stop breathing then start snore gasping for air. When they stop breathing i cross my fingers and pray they dont start breathing again so i can get some sleep. And to teeth grinders here’s a big soap bar to the face and middle finger. Get a mouth guard you pos.

    Reply
  25. No sympathy for the snorer. Dont stay in hostels if you snore. Its likely that you are a fat ass like this chick in my room. No headphones don’t work! You want quiet when you sleep. Otherwise you’d sleep thru snoring. Earplugs? Ha! No. They don’t work. Snoring is disgusting. The sounds. Yuck. If someone has apnea and stops breathing. I cross my fingers and pray they don’t start breathing again so i can sleep. There are products to make you stop or you can drop that extra 40kilos thats making you so fat you snore. Fat fatty mcfatterson fat. And to the teeth grinders. Get a mouth guard for god sake. And quit all the quim crying about frosty air in the morning you louse of the lunar.

    Reply
  26. Just a thought mate but what if YOU deal with your fucking issues rather than burdening several others every night of travel? There are many, many ways to treat your issue. And if you are too obnoxious (I have a hunch you might be) maybe YOU should consider alternative sleeping arrangements. Not the other 10 people in your room. Not even a good attempt at justifying your weaknesses. Sick of people making their problems other peoples problems also. – from a sleepless traveller of 3 nights. This holiday is suddenly dreadful. Cheers, dick head and those like you.

    Reply
    • Wouldn’t you rather pay an extra $10 a night for a private room and avoid the constant embarrassment of being a snorer?
      If you can’t afford it then ask every poor soul in your dorm room to donate $1 towards it.
      You suck.

      Reply
  27. This is kinda of a cocky post on your part man.

    I’ve been travelling for a long time and I use hostels a lot. The fact that you post about the fact no one every things about the snorer is very cocky indeed and that people chose to be in community environment (the hostel) so deal with the snorer, oh that’s so cocky.

    You have the ability not to piss people off. There are so many things that people who snore can do to fix the issue.

    I have no sympathy for snores. A few times I’ve slapped a pillow hard in their face until I figured out how to stop hearing it with special headphones that make me hear my breathing and nothing else.

    You do deserve the evil stares in the morning if you snore as you made the choice to go in the dorm knowing you piss people off not having done anything about your condition that can get fixed. If it’s a little surgery that’s needed or maybe you are fat and nee to loose weight as thats a big factor or if you get one of those little things you put on your nose.

    Sorry man no sympathy. If you’re not cocky and arrogant you will allow this reply to stay on your blog and then go and figure out how to fix your problem 😉

    Reply
  28. I agree with other posters. It is YOU that is being selfish, inconsiderate and rude. If I NEED to get up to go to the toilet during the night do I just stumble around and make noise because it’s just something that ‘I do’? Of course not. And id expect to be judged and ridiculed for that. If you take no steps to prevent it, then you sir, are the inconsiderate dick head.

    Reply
  29. Currently in Phnom Penh in a six bed hostel with my girlfriend. There are two snorers who seem to be on some sort of f**ked up snoring shift pattern. One of them starts when the other one stops. Tomorrow we have a bus to Vietnam which we know is going to be uncomfortable and will not be able to catch up on any sleep due to said snorers. The other girl in my room has been sobbing for about an hour now because this is her second night with these guys without any sleep at all.
    Snoring truly robs people of their basic needs as a human being, earplugs or no earplugs. It also robs people of their next day’s enjoyment.
    I think the fact you feel guilt the next day is important, because you know its not nice for others who are for the most part, too polite to wake you up and will suffer in silence while you get your sleep.

    Reply
    • Thanks for the comment. I know this is a big issue for many people. It’s interesting how many messages I get from people who are ‘currently in bed in a hostel room with snorers’. Honestly, I hope you manage to get some sleep soon.

      Reply
  30. Honestly, I find your point of view insulting, people DO have the right to be angry about snorers, if I blast a movie on my laptop using the speakers and I don’t let you sleep I am the bad guy, or if another guy is walking around all night, then he is the bad guy. The point is it disturbs the sleep of other people, personally I will always complain to the guy snoring, as often as it is necessary. If he won’t let me sleep, well, I won’t let him sleep either

    Reply
    • I guess the difference is that the person blasting a movie has a choice about whether to do that or not. He is making a conscious decision to disturb others. Snorers don’t have that ability to just turn it off. But I see your point.

      Reply
      • But if you know you’re a snorer and you choose to stay in a dorm, you’re making a conscious decision to disturb others. FYI earplugs don’t work. Cut your trip down by a day or two and get your own room. Even in a case where a snorer has done ‘all’ that they can to stop their snoring (which you haven’t – those mouth guards have been around for ages) they should get their own rooms. A snorer above said she was on her second month of travelling and that she was keeping everyone in her room awake every night but she couldn’t afford a single room – I’ll repeat, second month of travelling..

        Reply
  31. I came here because i googled snoring in dorm. It was 9pm, I was in a 6 beds dorm and was outside the room when one of the ppl inside screamed “nobody in room snore except her!” I was so embarrassed and ran away. I went to find a private room nearby. I took up courahe to go back to the room to collect my stuffs and luckily no one is in the room. Today is a sad day for me =(

    Reply
  32. You’re a cunt. Please dont try and make yourself feel better by venting your opinion. If you snore rent a single room. Or neck yourself you piece of rat turd. I dont pity you. I eish people like you were destroyed.

    Reply
  33. Yes we conciously chose to sleep in a communal space but so does the snorer. The snorer choses to sleep in a communal space in which he knows he’ll disturb others. I’m currently wearing earplugs and they do nothing for my neighbourings grating. No forgiveness.

    Reply
  34. What I usually do is just pound on their bed twice with my hands. Not to get them fully awake, but to just stop their snoring and change their sleeping pattern. Sometimes it doesn’t work but it often does. At least it gives me enough time to fall asleep with silence. My ears are too small for earplugs. Tried them in airplanes and yeah they don’t work. And won’t fall asleep with music (my phone has a low-battery life, anyway, it’s a simple phone). I have to agree with you about the 6 am analogy. It’s people’s decision to start packing at 6 am rather than the night before. It’s what I try to do, to be respectful, but it also causes me less stress about getting to my next destination on time. I also hate when people start talking to others in the dorm in the morning when others are asleep (i mean before check-out time like 9 or 10, but not 11). They can always go to the commons area to talk. And those who turn on the light full-blast at night when others are sleeping. or in the morning despite enough natural sunlight in the room. So it’s definitely others who disturb as well. I use to have a habit of being on my laptop at night and typing when others are sleeping but I don’t do that anymore. Or have the laptop light blaring in someone’s eyes. And about music to try and help sleep…that’s ok with headphones but keep the music down if you know others can hear it.

    Reply
    • I agree – there are some people who have no respect at all for others and turn on the lights in the middle of the night or early in the morning. Or talk really loudly when others are asleep. I guess it takes a bit of tolerance to cope with these dorm rooms! 🙂

      Reply
  35. 3:50 am, just moved to the dorm kitchen with my pillow and hoping to fall asleep on an uncomfortable chair and a table. This is because there was a dude snoring in my 6 bed dorm room. NOBODY was sleeping because of him. Somebody was on their phone, somebody was sitting on the bed, others kept yawing. Before leaving the room I gave him a pat on his arm, just to see if I could make him stop snoring without waking him up. He woke up, went to the toilet, came back and started snoring again. Yesterday I had a full day at college and today I will have again classes all day, which is going to be great with basically no sleep. No need to say I was wearing headphones on a loud volume. There is something about snoring that make it worse than any other noise.
    I’m sorry of what you have to go through, I know the snorer doesn’t do it on purpose, but jesus if you are going to keep 5+ people awake how can you say they should just deal with it?

    Reply
  36. I think some people don’t know if they snore or not or they might snore sometimes, but not others, so don’t think they’ll be snoring in the dorm. If you live alone, how do you know? At least that’s my experience in the mission center where I live. (Granted, we’re really religious girls who don’t spend the night with our boyfriends, etc.)

    Reply
  37. I think the cause of most of the hostility is that people can do crazy things when they’ve had no sleep. I just got off a 12 hour flight with no sleep (snorer almost the whole flight) arrived at the hostel and had to wait 8 hours to check in (very early arrival…) finally got into the room at about 4pm fell asleep at maybe 6pm and guess what; got woken up at 8 by a really really loud snorer how has proceeded to snore the entire night. It is now 3:30 and I have had about 2 hours sleep in 48 hours. I am ready to kill someone (preferably her) but I know this is not how I usually think, but sleep is so important for descision making and logical thought. I would be surprised if someone hadn’t actually killed their roommate for snoring before.
    Is it ok to request another dorm room from the front desk? I am seriously considering upgrading my room right now even though I really can’t afford it. (Like I said, descision making impaired)

    Reply
  38. I’ve just been on the opposite side … In a 12-person dorm room in Tasmania and I’ve been woken up multiple times throughout the night because I was snoring and now I can’t go back to sleep.

    I agree with the poster’s argument – when in a hostel you are saving $$$ in exchange for whatever discomfort might come with sharing a *public* room. I think the best analogy was that no one has the right to get angry at a cripple moving slowly on the sidewalk and slowing everyone else down – public places are for everyone, snorers included.

    Why should snorer’s have to pay a premium for a private room rather than light sleepers? People can expect others to be considerate – but within the bounds of that which they can control. Snorers that have already tried to solve the problem (using the myriad products on offer) to no avail shouldn’t have to suffer indignation any more than cripples shouldn’t be asked to not use the sidewalks because everyone else is affected.

    Bottom line, hostels are essentially public places where people pay for a public place to sleep. Expectation of quietness is not guaranteed.

    Reply
    • Thanks for the comment. I’m sorry to hear that you didn’t get a good night’s sleep because of a snorer. I do have sympathy, honestly. But it’s also reassuring to hear that you can see my side of the argument. I hope you have a great trip in Tassie!

      Reply
    • Buy a snore mask you selfish pos. If it doesnt work, then at least you tried; and people will see you with it on and know that you are trying. If it does work, then problem solved.

      Reply
    • wrong wrong wrong.
      Slowing down on a sidewalk because of someone else’s disability is very different from being sleep-deprived, which can lead to all kinds of accidents. A dormmate who needs to drive the next day but is sleep-deprived because of an inconsiderate snorer could get into an accident that results in death.
      Cripples often pay extra money for paraphernalia that help them move faster, but many snorers in hostels do not even spend on mouth guards. Snorers need to stop being selfish and think of the consequences of their choices.
      If you have a bladder or digestive problem that causes you to stink up a room because you ‘con’t control it’, you should not sleep in a dorm. Same if you have a snoring problem. No exceptions for snorers.

      Reply
  39. Im like a little pissed of at the moment. I snore and i knew about it. But only wheni am sleeping on my back. So tonight i was sleeping on my back. At 2am i some drunk girls where talking loud about 1 hour in the dorm. At 3.30 am some Dutch Guys where totally drunk in the room laughing about 1 1/2 hours and at 6 am some girls turn the lights on to pack the backpacks. But i’m ok with it. I choose to sleep in a dorm with 13 other people so yeah, it was my choice. But what was the forst thing that i hear today? “You shithead were snoring all the night”. I was really ofended :/ I think that if you sleep in a dorm than you must accept every kind of human in it. Even people that snores. So i think that yeah, if you not like snorers, drunk people or whatever kind of people, than you are the person that needs a private and not me. I try to sleep on my stomage, i tell people that they can wake me uo and tell me to change my position. But even if some guys are not stopping snoring, for me its ok. Its a Dorm. 52% of Mans snores. So i have to accept it or if not then i must search for a private. So my dear snorers, dont feel bad about it. Tell the people that you snore so they went not surprise about it and then ignore the people. 52% of the man are like you 🙂

    Reply
  40. I’m in a situation where I’m bunked up with a few other people. One dude snores so loud that I only get about 2 or 3 hours of sleep every night. I definitely don’t blame him, and he’s a really great guy, but when you have full day’s work and only so many hours of sleep every single night, it drives you insane. So far I’ve tolerated it and just stayed awake, but when I think about how I’m stuck in this place for a long, long time to come, it drives me mad. When you’re really tired and you know you can’t escape this for another year the thoughts you can have in the moment will shock you. I don’t believe in shaming or some of the other crazy things people have done, but I am this close to just losing my mind. And the dude’s so nice too, so I can’t even blame him. I should just give up sleeping.

    Reply
    • A whole year ahead of you?! Yeah, that’s a very different situation, isn’t it? Although I wonder whether you’ll find it easier and just get used to it as background noise.
      I’ll be curious to know whether you find a solution.

      Reply
    • It’s the fact that snoring can’t be helped is precisely the reason why a snorer should not sleep in a shared space.
      Talking, playing music — these can be controlled. With enough censure and complaints, dormmates will stop.
      Putting snoring on par with other types of noise in a dorm room is just not accurate. Most people will not talk loudly all night. Snorers can be at it all night. Hostels have rules about noise as well, and will intervene when they are not followed. Some will even kick out customers for being noisy past a certain time.
      Hostels are still not protecting customers from snorers, however. It’s time they did.

      Reply
  41. I’m travelling to Asia solo in a few months and I am incredibly anxious and have been stressing over the fact how bad my snoring is. I actually googled ‘snoring in hostels’ and that’s how I found this article. I’ve had friends record me and it’s honestly something else. I don’t think people fully do understand the guilt and anxiety a snorer carries. I have a friend who is also a bad snorer and he sometimes turns down social invites (like camping) because he is so worried about how he is affecting others sleep. Some people seem to be under the impression we just do it and don’t even care nor have tried to fix it. I will be trying my best to stay in single rooms during my trip but sometimes it’s just not possible so I do hope I don’t have any too bad experiences and people can be a little forgiving (I’ll be carrying lots of ear plugs to hand out!)

    Reply
    • forgiving is not an issue.
      it is being sleep-deprived. Human beings without sleep are not going to be fully functioning and they are not going to pleasant to you or anyone else. These are the consequences and risks of sleeping in a shared space.
      There are gadgets and remedies. The extra expense on these may prevent the extra expense on single rooms. You just have to persist and be determined to find solutions.

      Reply
  42. Oh and just to add- there were some pretty hurtful comments left on this post! I wish people would think twice and how their words can affect others.
    I am so conscious of my snoring when I have been sharing rooms with others I try my best to stay awake until everyone has fallen asleep (I’ve never stayed in a hostel yet so I don’t think this technique will work there) and I’ve always told people to wake me up if I’m snoring so I can stay awake again until they can get to sleep. So yes, I might keep you awake with my snoring that is completely out of my control but you bet I’m doing everything I can in a situation to ensure you get just as good sleep if not a better one.
    Thanks for writing this article, it’s fantastic.

    Reply
  43. There is a little different between one snorer paying extra for a hotel room or ten people loose their night sleep and the worth of money their

    Reply
  44. best blog post i’ve read so far, and this is my situation right now! I feel guilty and self conscious about my snoring, im trying throat sprays, nasal sprays, staying awake as long as i can until everyone else has gone to sleep. I’m considering getting either a chin strap (not a great look, looks like head gear for rugby players!) and the mouthguard just so I can alleviate the decibel levels abit! I’ve even woken up on two occasions to everyone else in the dorm talking and laughing with each other about my snoring and how annoying it was! if they did do dorm rooms for heavy snorers, that would be a dream, because then there would be no more guilt and we could all get a great sleep. making friends is definitely a part of travelling and its not nice getting dirty looks in the morning by everyone as if you snore on purpose! I do wish there was more understanding for the snorer. I’m glad I’m not the only one who has this concern, this has made me feel so much better 🙂

    Reply
  45. Man, the lack of compassion and empathy in here is amazing. You’re in a hostel room with 8 people and you’re upset because one person snores? Got get a freaking private room if you’re so sensitive to sleep.

    Otherwise, put on your earplugs.

    Reply
  46. Another one here awake at 5am because of a snorer.. I am no light sleeper and this woke me up. I have headphones in with my music almost at top volume but can still hear the snores over the top.
    On my way back from the toilet I tried to gently wake the snorer to ask him to roll onto his side to quieten the snores but no response. I actually rocked him quite vogourusly after that (to the giggles of a girl awake on her phone) – still no response. This same guy and his friends also came back at 3am from a night out and made quite a lot of noise then too.
    I barely slept last night because of it so we’re on night number two. Not looking forward to tomorrow night (praying they check out but I am not hopeful!)
    I understand snoring is not done with intent or malice but it is robbing multiple people of a whole night of sleep potentially for consecutive nights.
    If the snorer cannot afford a private room and has not tried / is not helped by a snoring mouthpiece, could you guys consider moving to a different room or hostel every night? That way at least the sleep deprivation only lasts for one night at a time (unless you are unlucky and have multiple snorers)
    Just a thought.

    Reply
  47. NICE BLOG…Many people are facing this issue, but for that proper treatment is very necessary. Snoring is seen more of a bedtime annoyance for people sleeping together, it is a sign of an underlying health issue called Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). It is one of the most under diagnosed sleep disorders and is more like a silent epidemic. Very few know about the condition and fewer seek treatment….Thank you for sharing…

    Reply
  48. Weeeeeell, don’t get me wrong I understand the dilemma and I’m not completely unsympathetic towards you but there is a huge difference between being woken up at 6 am for ten minutes to maybe half an hour because someone is moving out or getting up to being awoken EVERY HOUR. Sleep deprivation is used as a torture technique over the decades for a reason.
    You snore and keep me awake for more than an hour? I for sure will wake you up. I’ll not be cold or snarky or unkind but if I get no sleep you won’t get none.
    All the excuses are bullshit for one simple reason: you know you snore? Go to the doctor, get checked and do something about it. It’s also not healthy for you.

    Reply
  49. Hahaha I love it, while reading this post & comments the guy finally stopped snorring. So funny people reading this while a snorrer is keeping them awake. Last time I share a room though!!!!!

    Reply
  50. But you’re wrong. The first rule of staying in a backpackers is not to disturbed others. If I do something every night that go on for hours at on end I would be expected to change my behavior. I can put up with the rustling and people making noise as they move around as this normally only go on for a few minutes. Snoring can and does go on for hours. If you know you snore you should be the one to take responsibility for it. Just like other people have to take responsibility for their actions.

    Reply
  51. Snorers are a total no go for hostels! Point and case! Heavy snorers know about their special behavior and the effect on others, and still impose their shit on others! This is totally unacceptable, as is sneezing on somebody, or eating like a pig, or speaking loud that 5 rooms can hear it, or leaving the trash on the meal table, or shitting on the floor, etc. The best candidates sleep fat on their backs where almost everybody will snore after 15 mins of sleep or so.
    Justification: if somebody in full knowledge of causing negative effects on others just continues to do so then this is an offencive act and shall be treated with no mercy! Obviously you know very well that you steal a full rooms sleep while you yourself have a good rest, this is totally unacceptable! I have not the slightest understanding for your bla bla, get a cure to get rid of the snoring, or get a single room where you are not torturing others in full knowledge!
    The smelly hippy – at least I NEVER had anybody smelling so bad that this cost me a nights sleep, but countless empathy less weirdos as you are!

    Reply
  52. So you know full well that you snore loudly and disturb the sleep of others, yet you still choose to sleep in a dorm room. You are a fuckwit, be considerate to others.

    Reply
  53. What a load of BS. If you think it’s ok to ruin everyone’s sleep because you want a cheap room, that’s just plain selfish. And then calling the other people inconsiderate… What’s wrong with you?

    Reply
  54. Hmm. Perhaps hostels should offer a special booking option for ‘snorers’. They have all female dorms, so how about an all snorers dorm. LoL. If I was “that guy” though,I’d try to book a private more often than not.

    Reply
    • You know what, I actually don’t think that’s a terrible idea. There are plenty of people who know/worry they snore,who would prefer to be with other snorers than disturb quiet sleepers.
      I wonder if anyone has ever tried this idea at a hostel before?

      Reply
  55. Sorry dude but I don’t sympathise. You’re the one that should get a private room. You SHOULD feel guilty that you slept at the expense of everyone else in that room.

    Stop with the earplugs excuse. They don’t do shit when you’re only feet away.

    You have to pay extra for a private room. If it bothers you that much financially, see a doctor and get it sorted. It’s not everyone else’s problem.

    Also – this post has a misleading title. There are no solutions here. Just “put up with it, we can’t help it”. Not helpful.

    Reply
  56. I completely disagree. Would you like it if I had a loud phone conversation at 1:30am for a few hours or blasted music? Or switched the light on and off?? No. If you know you are a snorer you shouldn’t stay in a shared dorm. It’s inconsiderate and completely disruptive to EVERYONES sleep.

    Reply
  57. PS currently have 2 people snoring so fucking loud in my dorm and the remaining 4 of us are awake. It’s fucked. You need to get a private room and stay away from shared dorms. As for “frosty good mornings” they are lucky I don’t strangle them in their sleep. ARGH

    Reply
  58. They have a right to be grumpy, you might have a few stares in the Morning but you would have had an entire sleep for the night . Where 5 or 8 other paying customers have had next to none . Go to a dr and try to get this corrected or get a private room .

    Reply
  59. Earplugs dont work when the snorer is loud. There is new affordable technology that will reduce the level of your snoring. I suggest you invest in that

    Reply
  60. Snoring abuse my foot. You are abusing everyone one in the room with your snoring. Snoring in Dorms is selfish and you know you snore and know you keep people awake you selfish self centred person.

    Reply
  61. Mate I think you are victimising yourself a bit too much , if you know you do snore very badly shouldn’t you be the one not choosing to stay in a dorm in the first place to respect others ? I think this is most of people’s resentment comes from , from the fact that a dorm is a common area of respect and one of them is silence at night so everyone can have a good sleep , and if one person is disturbing the peace of the lot and it’s doing it knowingly then that person should take responsibility about it and not the others.. if someone has stinky feet the acceptable thing to do is that that person puts some feet powder or whatever if it knows that it will stay in a communal space to not disrespect the others , I know there are snoring patches and solutions , or at least as other people commented a good solution is to separate dorms as ” heavy sleepers and light sleepers ” , or that snorers give permission to the other guests to turn them on their sides of they’re being too loud , but I don’t think it’s acceptable that because of one person wanting to save some bucks all the rest will suffer the consequences , cheers.

    Reply
  62. I understand it’s not the snorers fault…. it’s still very annoying.
    I’ve just woken up after a sleepless night due to a dorm room snorer. He wakes up at 7am- the snoring stops, I finally get to sleep. He then proceeds to put his hand on my bed to steady himself and starts talking loudly to the other people in the room. Snoring can’t be helped but to be followed by this inconsideration is really the icing!

    Reply
  63. Just don’t go into dorms you selfrightous Idiot. You are desturbing the sleep of other people. Don’t act like there is nothing you could do. You make me sick.

    Reply
  64. Nope. YOU have also chosen to stay in a common room, knowing quite well that you will keep multiple people awake but your inconsiderate choice. Oh no, you’re embarrassed? My day is ruined because I am tired, as is that of several others! You chose to do this to us; we did not choose you. Get a private room. Also, if you’re one of the ones stumbling in drunk (which makes snoring worse) in the middle of the night, you’re even more guilty.

    Reply
  65. You must be kidding me. Get yourself a private dorm. We don’t pay to hear you snore all night long. We wanna sleep, TOO. Earplugs can’t filter all the noise and are dangerous in the long term! Get your shit together.

    Reply
  66. Mike, you are a terrible selfish person who needs to learn basic respect, I am sure your mother taught you better. If you don’t think sleeping in dorms knowing full well you will keep people awake is wrong, you are just a bad person. There is no two ways about it. The fact you would post this like you are a victim is insane. Grow up

    Reply
    • I completely agree with you. This guy is trying to let the ‘snorers’ to pass like the victims. Unbelievable. Fuck off and take a single room next time. You are not the victim, you are the PROBLEM.

      Reply
  67. This discussion illustrates the major problem with low-cost international travel these days.
    Unfortunately, it’s been taken over by whiny, entitled hipster Millennials. These crybabies think wherever they go, the environment needs to change to cater to their fragile little temperaments. They wouldn’t know hardship if it bit them on their little carefully bleached buttholes.
    Guess what, you sniveling brats? People have been dealing with this stuff for generations, long before you poked your stylish dreadlocked heads and stocking caps into the picture.
    Hate to tell you, only one person thinks you look cool. The rest of us know you are posers.
    Listen up, whiners, here’s the answer. You just deal with it and move on. If you are making the decision to travel cheaply and use hostels, you get what you get. Every day it’s a different dynamic, that’s what a community is.
    If your fragile little psyches can’t adapt to a difficult environment then go back home to your rich baby boomer parents and sleep in your own safe little bedroom.
    Toughen up, you pitiful little babies. Can’t deal with a snorer, or a late night arrival or a drunken conversation, then what are you going to do when you are stuck somewhere far less comfortable?
    Can’t learn to adapt to shorter sleeping patterns or occasional sleep deprivation? Then don’t stay where that is a possibility or teach yourself to sleep through anything. Half the problem with you getting back to sleep is the amount of brain energy you generate being offended in the echo chamber between all metal you have piercing your stupid fucking heads.
    As much as mommy and daddy have convinced you that it does, the entire world does not shape itself to your every stupid desire.

    Reply
    • WORD! I’ve been staying at hostels since 2005, and it never seemed to be an issue then. Only in my recents travels have I seen this entitled perspective develop. That people think that if someone snores its the end of the world. If I go into a hostel room where no one snore I instantly become suspicous of these non humans.

      Reply
  68. Admittedly this is an ever recurring topic I grapple with. Especially in the night when it’s happening and the following day after I’ve lost sleep.

    I’ve read the arguments, the most insidious being that snoring is something one must come to expect when sleeping in shared spaces like hostels and if one wants peace, one ought to go for a private room. I beg to differ. I think that’s turning it on the head. The snorer should opt for the private room and it’s appalling to think the snorer deliberately choose to be negligent about his problem and inflict it on a room full of others. I can find no compassion, no mitigating circumstances to such selfish behavior. I’m surprised people haven’t been murdered over this. Last night I found myself enduring many a violent thought.

    Reply
  69. I will be a true follower of your manifesto buddy! I won’t be ashamed anymore! People in Berlin are gonna hear some loud snores though ;))

    Reply
  70. No. I have been listening to some terrible snoring for about an hour right now and I cannot forgive you. It’s your problem, not the other six persons’ in the room. If you know you’re a snorer and you still stay in dorms, it’s wrong. Get a room! 😛

    Reply
  71. I forgive you, keep in mind for everyone that snoring cannot be controlled with our minds. all of that will happen by itself. no one wants to snore while sleeping but all that will happen by itself.

    Reply
  72. I’m in a room now with a snoring person. What’s so hard is it’s in frequent .. nothing, then a whistle, then a full train, then quiet, then a door creaking, then and little moan, then a barge or old large sea vessel, then a pig pen, then nothing, then a zippered jacket, then a sigh, and air, and cough, and mumble, gasp.. omg is she ok? Choking? Then a snore , then a dog toy squeek, then huffing. Snarling.. Not sure how to deal with all the thoughts and feelings I have. Anxiety about being able to hike tomorrow on a once in a lifetime trip ive worked hard for . Worry if this person is going to make it through the night,.a bit of anger as this person kept asking me questions while others were trying to sleep and also doesn’t speak my language well so they didn’t understand my answers and I didn’t want to be rude to the sleeping girl on the bottom bunk.. and now I’m here wondering if I should lay here resting my body .. trying not to seeth ..trying to be zen.. ahh.. yes it stopped.. no that was just 5 glorious seconds of sweet, restful, silence.. oh silence.. why I came on this trip.. but yes I’m in a pricey hostel days before my birthday realizing maybe I’m too old for this.. maybe I’m a bad person for feeling angry with this old possibly sick lady … Maybe tonight is just a bad night and I’m praying she leaves first in the morning. Also these dorms have their own bathroom ( showers in Hall) . At first I was like woah .. fancy! But now I’m like boo no good… Because .. oh the bathroom noises she made. Woah.. and that was my first impression.. how do we separate the terrible symphony of all human sounds squished into one being and the actual spirit being of a person who is prob a good, loving, day time person..exploring the natural wonders of mountains and valleys? Where is the Namaste in all of this? Na- I’m leaving.
    Thank you for a place to rent in the wee hrs of the morning in the glorious Canadian Rockies. Pray I don’t fall off a cliff tomorrow. I’d like to say peace n love turtle doves but instead I must say.. if you are sick or know you snore badly or have sleep apnea… Please choose to make private arrangements for lodging. Id donate $ to every hostel lobby collection pool for you cause and pathway to solitary sleeping arrangements. And guess what? I’ll cheerfully greet you in the morning and ask all about where your from and what you’re writing about.

    Reply
  73. People are just bad. Snoring is the product of a medical condition mainly driven by a deviated septum. The surgery to fix it is called Septoplasty, but not everyone can do it, even if you snore. This happened to me for 10 years. Three years ago I was old enough to get the surgery done and I don’t snore anymore, however, I do help people who snore instead of giving them the look.

    For snoring haters:
    It seems to me, in the end, that people go to hostels to ‘save a few bucks’ and you even want the whole deal for that little price. If you enjoy your precious sleep book a private room. No other solution. It also seems to me that you are complaining just because the book says you have to complain. 99% of the time you don’t wake up from a snore, you just can’t conceal the sleep. Light sleepers wake up for any sound. Even when someone opens the door or the hallway light enters the room. So in their world, people who snore, sleep late, go to parties or kiss in the room need to go to a Snoring, party, kissing room so that all light sleepers can have their perfect experience.

    For snorers:
    I have lived 10 years of hostels without bothering almost anyone. What I did was to always sleep a bit less. Usually went to the room 2 am when everyone is already sleeping and wake up at 7 am. That is 5 hours sleep more than you actually need. People usually don’t wake up from your snoring unless you are a very loud snorer. Then, whenever I was too tired (after 6 days or so), I upgraded that night to a single room and get my sleep. If you feel ashamed that you snore, another solution you are always welcome to switch hotels every nights.

    Reply
    • some comments are stubbornly likening snoring to other annoyances like lights on, door opening, etc. they are not in the same category. all the rest can be controlled, snoring cannot, unless the snorer takes the necessary remedies. most snorers do not, and that’s why a snorer’s room is suggested.
      tired of of these poor ‘philosophical’ categorizations.

      Reply
  74. The thing is that snorers could let us know in advance that it might be a noisy night coming up. I just told the guy that he was one of the worst people to sleep in a dorm room with as I was awake the whole night. That I could have avoided if he had told me beforehand. I’m sure as hell going to get earplugs and sleeping pills now and changed the room. He said “that’s what you get sleeping in a dorm room”. I mean sure it is but he could have apologised and told be that he snores because he had a good night sleep and I didn’t! Next time I’m honestly just going to wake him up and tell him that it’s too noisy. I would recommend you guys to do the same. Just wake up the snorer cause once he is awake he won’t snore. You might fall asleep faster than him.

    Reply
    • That’s a fair point. Sometimes snorers don’t realise they are as bad as they actually are – or they haven’t been doing it for a while and it just starts again one night. Also, it can be an embarrassing thing to discuss. But I certainly appreciate your point and agree that communication can solve a lot of the issues.

      Reply
  75. I have the same problem…absolutely embarrassed for causing the disturbance caused and have resorted to booking private rooms only now 🙁

    Reply
  76. I’ve stayed in over 20 hostels and 3/4 of the time at least one person snores (to various degrees). I ususally just laugh it off. I manage to go back to sleep or put on my earphones and Youtube something to fall asleep to.
    I’ve shown tolerence towards these people because frankly, snoring is a very common thing. Statistics show that at least 50% percent of people will go through periods of their lives when they will snore.

    I myself go through periods of snoring and I’ve recently been a ‘victim’ of snoring abuse in a hostel. And more than just dirty looks in the morning, two girls started to poke me in the night to wake me up saying that I was snoring. I tried changing position, but apparently didn’t work, like many people, I move in my sleep and probably unknowingly moved back into a position that made me more inclined to snore.
    Another night (in the same hostel, but with different roommates), one girl started complaining very loudly in the middle that I was snoring.

    Waking people up because someone is snoring or poking a stranger in the middle of the night because they are snoring is absolutely inexcusable. Imagine some stranger poking you while you’re spleeping. It is extremely agressive, because unlike snoring, it’s a physical agression. They were lucky that I didn’t physically defend myself.

    I have never witnessed this type of behaviour before whether I was the person snoring or the person having to endure someone snoring.

    I’ve had to endure plenty of peoples bad behaviour in hostel, such as : leaving their stuff all over the place (like the middle of the floor) or that it blocks access to my bed or locker; leaving the bathroom floor wet after they shower so that I splipped entering the bathroom; turning up the heat at night so high that I woke up sweaty, dehydrated with a splitting headache the next morning. I’ve also had to endure people coming in and out at all hours either because they were out having fun or they had an early or late flights or even had to get up early for a tour…the list can go on and on…

    So people can say if you snore: don’t go to a hostel. And others can say if you’re noise sensitive: don’t go to a hostel.
    In hostels, what it comes down to is that everybody has to live with everyones bad habits or behaviour may they be conscious or unconscious.
    If you’re going through a snoring spell: try to avoid alcool, try nose strips, etc whatever you can to help eleviate the problem.
    If you are easily woken : earplugs or earphones and listen to something that will help you get back to sleep.

    Reply
    • Thanks for your thoughts, Carey. It’s really interesting to hear from someone who both snores and has been disturbed by snoring. I agree with you completely that there is no excuse for poking someone in their sleep just because they are making noise. That is physical assault and it is done by someone who is awake and conscious. It’s just not acceptable!

      Reply
    • Carey, first, the fact you can compare someone waking you up by poking you to physical assault is ridiculous. You are waking someone up. What they are doing to you is the EXACT SAME thing you are doing to them. Sucks to be woken up by an inconsiderate person, doesn’t it? Also, there are snore masks and mufflers available that significantly muffle your snoring listed on previous posts here. They work very well. Go get one. I rarely sleep in Hostels anymore, but when I did, if someone was snoring and I did not see a muffler on their face, then I would have no problem waking them up.

      Reply
    • “Snoring abuse” ? Isn’t snoring in a room full of strangers abusing other’s health? If there is an imminent fire in the room, you would appreciate being woken up or poked. If your snoring is endangering other people’s health, and YOUR health because you could choke or have a stroke in the middle of the night because of your health condition, then you should be appreciative of being woken up. Apparently, you do not want to be disturbed while you’re in the middle of disturbing others and keeping them awake ALL night.

      Reply
  77. I arrived here because it’s 3.26am and my flight is first thing in the morning and I haven’t been able to get a single moment of sleep yet because of the fog horn on the bottom bunk. Sorry, but if you know you have a snoring problem (which is a health issue that should and can be addressed) then staying in a communal room is selfish. You aren’t a victim! The victims are the other 7 people suffering in this room! And I do have earplugs deeply inserted, the piercing fog horn snores come right through anyway. Yours sincerely, a really hacked off and sleep deprives traveller who has also paid to stay in the hostel.

    Reply
  78. Hello Michael,

    Currently on the Camino de Santiago, and I can appreciate your point, and promise to make an effort not to be rude or short with the snorer…. however, seeing as it’s 1300 and I’m quite literally pulling my hair out because the guy I’m sharing a bunk with has been sawing logs for hours, and likely suffering from sleep apnea (so it’s not even ryrhmic),I’m a bit livid.

    You can’t control emotions, but you can however control snoring. As a medical professional, I highly advise all with snoring and other sleep issues to seek attention. There is strong evidence that those struggling from sleep disorders, such as apnea, have higher risks for diseases such as diabetes, high blood pressure, and obesity. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3096276/

    If you’re snoring so loud it’s waking others, you’re likely not getting enough oxygen yourself. Treatment is not as expensive as believed either, nose strips (which typically aren’t going to fix the underlying problem, but a good start) cost around 6 euro. C-pap machines are probably the most effective, but may be a hefty cost (600 euro) and a bit unconfortable at first, however the results have proven time and time again. There is also some research into mouth guards that help to pull your jaw forward to open your airway. My point, is that there are options.

    To snore is human, but oxygen brings life and you snorers lack that. Also, you may spare yourself the unfortunate death from pillow smothering. Snorring drives me INSANE!

    Best, and good travels!

    Reply
    • you notice that Michael never responds to these posts about real medical solutions? because that would be relinquishing victimhood and taking responsibility for one’s self and for others. it would mean giving up self-pity and emotional addictions.
      your medical solutions are the real ‘stop’ to ‘snoring abuse’ — that is, abuse by inconsiderate snorers.

      Reply
  79. Currently can’t sleep because a man is snoring and gurgling in my dorm room. I disagree whole heartedly with you. Especially from someone who is AWARE of how disruptive their snoring is for all of the other people in your room, you continue to use dormitories? Now on top of that you want pity? I am so sorry you find it hard to make friends but that is because you have just prevented anyone from having a good nights sleep! If you’ve only slept a couple hours you are going to be cranky! Absolutely ridiculous and selfish.

    Reply
  80. You can controll snoring, go to a doctor, it ruins it for everyone and it’s rude. If you snore you shouldn’t be allowed to stay in dorms

    Reply
  81. You say that people who choose you sleep in dorm rooms must take what comes and shouldn’t be angry with you? You know you snore and you’re choosing every time to disturb what, 3, 5, 7? other peoples sleep. You might not choose to snore but you choose to inflict it on others. You can take their anger. You’re choosing it. You’re asking for pity? Its much easier to give on a full nights sleep.

    Posted at 1am from an 8 bed dorm, with headphones in, still able to hear the fucking snoring, exhausted after a day of hiking, and fucking angry.

    Reply
  82. Very interesting read. In backpacking around the world I too have experienced the same frosty greeting some mornings due to my occasional snoring. I agree that if you choose to stay in a dorm environment with other travelers you must expect that not everything will be to your liking. In saying that though as fellow travelers we must do all we can to limit our disruption to others. I make sure to pack nose strips which will normally stop me from snoring but this also includes packing the night before if you have to leave at 6am. Would take snoring any day over 2-3 people crunching plastic bags at 6am. As well as drunken travelers who come into the dorm at 3am, turn on the lights and then proceed to talk and laugh for an hour. It’s all about respect.
    In saying that I have also encountered many of the “Kill all Snorers” brigade who complained that I was snoring but failed to realize that they snore as well.
    Backpacking is a great way to see the world but we must remember to respect others and the places we visit.

    Reply
  83. There are snorers who choose a private room because of their issue. That’s good and it shows that they have some social IQ. It’s fucking annoying with snorers

    Reply
  84. Easy to say as the one who gets to sleep. You’d be cranky too if you were kept up at all hours because of someone else’s breathing problems.

    Reply
  85. Or, and stay with me for a moment, you could actually do something to address your snoring. Get a snore guard. Deal with your apnea. Talk to a doctor.

    You don’t deserve pity when you’re the one ruining people’s trips. If you actively stay at a hostel knowing you’re going to disturb people’s sleep, well, that shows a callous disregard for other travelers.

    Don’t want to be a bad guy? Then don’t put yourself in situations where you ruin other people’s vacations. Or, suck it up and don’t get upset when people talk about how much they hate snorers.

    Reply
  86. Wauw, this is bs. Reading the comments, you didn’t try to fix it at all, and you are aware you are a crazy loud snorer. I hope you at least tried to fix your problem now. Piece of advice: I wake up the snorer because why should I let them sleep if I can’t sleep? Sometimes multiple times a night. Oh, you feel bad? Then stay up a while, let others sleep, then go back to bed. This guy next to me sounds like damn Godzilla, trembling the beds and it’s a 20 people dorm. But poor victim… Right? Also he’s so drunk and high, he can’t be woken up.

    Reply
  87. have you tried anything so that you don’t snor…it’s a public space that you also are sharing…so it’s your responsibility also to not disturb…it’s like smoking in public space…it’s hurting other people’s sleep which is very very precious…and if happening everyday nobody can forgive it…why don’t you take anti snoring methods(google it)…I thought this article will end up with the remedy you tried successfully…such a selfish person you are

    Reply
  88. this is some bullshit. I have made a decision to stay in a communal space, expecting the decency of my fellows to allow me to sleep. You seem to make the decision to stay in a communal space, knowing full well you will rob several people of their sleep.
    If you know you snore, please take your own room.

    Reply
  89. Your post is very thoughtless. Before to decide sharing a dorm seek medical help, pay accomadition where you can stay alone or pay for an exorcism.

    Reply
    • If you snore do not stay in a 12 person room in a hostel. Know you have a problem and be a decent human being and stay in a single room or hotel. I have ear plugs in right now and some guy sounds like he’s dying next to me. Hostels aren’t for you.

      Reply
  90. I really don’t get your point. I am in a dorm right now with the 4th snorer this holiday. He is next to my ear and earbuds don’t work: I have them in right now. I can’t sleep with headphones on and why should I? I do not feel bad for the snorer because he is sleeping and I am not. Personally, if I were a snorer I would never aleep in a dorm room, it’s selfish. Just like I don’t turn on the light when people are trying to sleep or make loud noises (like snoring!) all night. I sincerely try to be considered to all, I wish these snorers did to. And never a sorry or a warning. Sorry but you clearly do not know what it is like for the other people in the dorm, otherwise you’d understand that they’re crumpy in the morning.

    Reply
  91. “you have no right to complain, youre in a communal room”

    Yes, but there’s such thing as courtesy… Otherwise, you should be alright with someone having sex in the room and waking everyone else up, right? I mean it is a communal area after all…

    All this as well, because of a health issue YOU have, that you cant be bothered fixing. And yet your complaint is “no one feels sorry for me waking everyone up, and them getting pissed at me” again, imagine that same line used by someone who takes their hookups into hostels, I doubt you’d take that line of thinking seriously there…

    And before you can say “but we cant help snoring” you can, there are products that stop ypu from snoring, and if it’s sleep apnea, you need to see your doctor

    Reply
  92. Have you ever tried to sleep in a room with a snorer?
    You pare wrong thinking it isn’t selfish to choose ap communal room when you’re going to ruin EVERYBODY’S DAY

    Reply
  93. No. If you snore, get a private room or hand out ear plugs. Why should the majority suffer because you won’t take responsibility for your disruptive condition?

    Reply
  94. Well, I do not for one bit feel sorry for the fat cow that booked passage next to me on a six-hour overnight bus trip, that is snoring his brains out. Especially since now, at 3 in the morning, he dragged his fat ass outside to eat at the planned stop, and I cannot help but wonder how worse it will be once he returns with a face stuffed of food and drink.

    Reply
  95. I am a 35 years old software professional and I have suffered from chronic snoring since last 1 year. My wife is not able to take complete sleep due to the pathetic sound from her snorer husband. After that I came to my house physician and he advised me to use CPAP masks for side sleepers. This mask is blessing for my life and after using it for 2 months my snoring problem is ended and I am able to take comfortable night sleep and same for my wife also. Thanks to cpap mask.

    Reply
  96. I’m waking up the hostel now… like. “Now” in 2019 because a person snore like… crazy. This is another level of snoring, earplug won’t work at all…

    And I forgive you… hope you try your best to not disturb other people anymore

    However lemme say one thing first, people have right to complaint what they don’t like and cause them the trouble and they cannot fix it by themselves…

    Instead of telling people to stop complaint but find the way to make yourself better should be better mindset… you are tired so you sleep and snore… is this your fault… yes… it’s disturbing and even you yourself know it… if other people wake you up because you snore too loud, you will be okay or not?

    You yourself know if you stay in hostel will cause this trouble to other but you still choose to do… honestly how asshole is that? Do you have options…. yes plenty. I don’t know technology back there in 2012 but nowadays., there are so many things reduce your snoring issues but if it’s doesnt work… you are the person to find other places to stay… be responsible for yourself instead of asking others to be responsible for you, they don’t even know you. That’s how we can May better society that people can live together happily.

    7 years after I hope your snoring situation gets better.

    Reply
  97. TBH I think if snorers know about their OWN problems they are the ones that should get a private room. Why do 9 people have to get their own rooms when only one is causing the problem?

    Reply
  98. All snorers should be put into the same bedroom. You can pitty each other there and let the others sleep – a basic right such as eating.

    Reply
    • It’s 1 am and it’s the second night I can’t sleep because of … yes, you guessed it, an incredibly loud snorer (who also happens to be a moaner). But the fact that people in the same situation have been posting here since 2012 just made me chuckle. My thoughts are with you all.

      Reply
  99. It‘s 3.12am and I am awake because of a snorer in my hostel and I don‘t feel sorry for ANYONE BUT ME and reading your article was slightly funny, but also pissed me off massively. If you are a snorer, then book yourself a single room, do the the other 5 people a favor, really.

    Reply
  100. You are an asshole for creating the problem for everyone else without giving having the consideration to actually fix it. it’s your responsibility to fix it. When you bother people’s sleep, you create problems. That’s why everyone hates you for snoring.

    Reply
  101. you can remedie it though. sleep on your side, raise your head, ect. dealing with 3 of the snorers right now and it’s 1am. I refuse to feel bad for the snorer, at least you got a nights sleep, unlike anyone else in the room.

    Reply
  102. Wait.. what?? How to stop the snoring abuse is the title of this article? Easy enough if you’re the one snoring. If you know you snore, then don’t stay at hostels. I get that totally blows, but suck it up and don’t make other people suffer.

    Reply
  103. You’re an idiot. Get your snoring fixed or mitigated so you can stop causing so much suffering to the people around you. If you know you’re an obnoxious snorer, then fuck you for staying in communal rooms. This makes me hate snorers even more for how apparently arrogant they are about their condition. There are remedies, so don’t give this bullshit about not being able to control it.

    Reply
  104. Funny that you turned it around so you’re the victim. If you go into an 8 bedroom dorm and you know you snore, you should consider the other 7 people by either getting something to help your snoring or putting a pillow over your head and hoping you’re not breathing by the time people want to sleep.

    You insult the hippies in the corners but I can almost guarantee you’re a fat guy who sleeps flat on his back and your insides can barely take it anymore.

    Consider your roommates

    Reply
  105. some people don’t know if they snore or not or they might snore sometimes, when I’m snooring, my friends take a video of me…and my snooring very laugh….hahaha..

    Reply
  106. It would not be such a problem only I am sharing with them long term and am not sure there is a viable solution in the works. Given that I am not going to get hostile or expect them to magically stop snoring.

    Reply
  107. Currently awake at 2am due to two very loud snorers on either side of me and I have to say that unfortunately I disagree. Earplugs do absolutely nothing for those heavy snores. I have Bon Iver blasting in my ear to drown it all out. It isn’t fair that in a room full of majority non-snorers that one keeps them all awake. Sure, we choose to pay the cheaper price for minor inconveniences, like people wandering in drunk or early awakenings but no, if you know you are a loud snorer – get your own room.

    I’ve dealt with plenty of snorers throughout my time in hostels and I have asked myself the question of whether I’m being too sensitive so many times. But it genuinely ruins your next day when you lie awake for hours on end when there is a bear sleeping next to you.

    Reply
  108. no sympathy for the hostel snorer. one person selfishly keeping the other 19 people awake all night because they “cant control it” there are ways to control it and if the snorer really cant do anything about it then they should get a private room. a snorer is a hostel is the save level of annoying as someone having loud sex or talking loudly the whole night

    Reply
  109. If you know you are a loud snorer it is your duty to get a private room and not disturb the sleep of everyone in a private space you lardass.

    Reply
  110. No, you’re a perfect nuisance to everyone. Snoring can easily be corrected my sleeping on your back instead of your side, or by using products or apparatus designed to stop snoring.
    Stop acting like a victim when you’re the only one having a good night of sleep.

    Reply
  111. Being kept awake is a form of torture, and as someone with insomnia who is forced to share a room with a snoring dickhead who doesn’t care about anyone else even after trying earplugs and music and all that jazz while he just lets his health deteriorate and isn’t even interested in WHY he snores, I’m going to offer you a “fuck no”.
    No: You don’t get to torture a whole room of people and then ask for them to pity you, tough fucking luck. “Boohoo im ruining the whole rooms health keeping them awake by sounding like a blender” how about YOU have some pity, spare a whole room of others some sleepless nights and fucking sleep outside so there is only ONE person who can’t sleep, incidentally the one with the problem in the first place. Go to a fucking doctor. I had pity in the beginning but Snorers get to sleep like a baby then think they don’t have to be considerate by trying to find things to fix their problems. I have found a solution though it is for every five minutes of constant snoring I play an alarm clock so he can get the same amount of sleep that I may get. NONE.

    Reply
  112. Surely if you know you disturb everyone around you, you should book a private room. There are also multiple things a snorer can do to relieve symptoms e.g not go out drinking all night

    Reply
  113. Snoring may be involuntary but it is your VOLUNTARY CHOICE to stay in a communal room. Get a private room for everyone’s sake, including your own.

    Reply
  114. I just woke up of sleeping in a room with a incredibly loud snorer and smells like he didn’t shower for a week… I was googling why are they allowed to share a room with others. So, why I am going to feel sorry for you, you should book a private room or a room with the people who chooses to travel with you knowing your condition.

    I couldn’t sleep because of him… Me, the other 2 strangers and a friend of him, I find it very selfish because he didn’t want to pay a bit more (in this case they were three and the place was super cheap, with lots of private rooms for 3) he didn’t take a private room with his friends.

    He is the cause of our lack of sleep, why should I feel sorry for a snorer that doesn’t give a damn about the ones affected by his condition. He should do something about it, the small band in the noose, not sharing with strangers, sleeping in the good side that will make him not snore… Something!!

    Reply
  115. You’re just fucking selfish. We all have issues and you deal with them in a nice or selfish way. You’re being selfish by staying in dorms. Sometimes when I’m drunk I have been told briefly that I snored. I’d happily be woken up to allow people to sleep. In hostels if you snore all the time… Don’t stay you selfish fuck. If you snore sometimes be happy to be woken up so the other 10 people have a chance to sleep to yeh? It’s not all about you. Yes you can’t help it but it is what it is and you should work with rather than be selfish. You’re article is one of the most pitiful things I’ve read in a while

    Reply
  116. The thing is YOU can control the snoring, there are devices designed to assist snorers, you should seriously seek a medical professional because chronic snoring is a sign of a possibly fatal disorder, and the thing is you know that you are a snorer and despite that fact YOU choose to sleep in these communal spaces, no one is going to feel sorry for you it is a problem you can start fixing and refuse to.

    Reply
  117. So, you are the problem by snoring, but everyone else should get earplugs? How about you stop being selfish, and get a private room. I’m amazed someone is stopping everyone from sleeping, but still think they are the victim.

    Reply
  118. Absolutely no sympathy for snorers. I will not write what everyone has already written, but I just wanted to say that this article is very ignorant. It’s simple math, either the snorer sleeps well and ten don’t, or the snorer removes himself from the situation and let’s the rest get a good night’s sleep. You are not the victim, you are the perpetrator. Use that negative feedback to do something about your problems because you sir, are a selfish man.

    Reply
  119. Dont fucking play the victim here! People that snore need to get a special room in a hostel. The fucking droning noise cuts through everything, music, podcast, whitenoise.
    Snorers in hostels are the fucking worst! They need to be locked up and the key trown away in the mariana trench

    Reply
  120. I tried to kill the guy in my hostel by throwing a water ballon fillied with roach spray he cried then left the hostel fuck him piece of shit snoring you should be beat brutally and with no mercy …

    Reply
  121. Oh bullshit you can too control snoring, there are options such as breathe right nasel strips. Why should I have to be uncomfortable and not be able to sleep just because you’re a fat ass that can’t lose weight

    Reply
  122. What a joke! You choose to make everyone else not sleep, you rob ppl of their sleep, go and stay in a room, not a dorm! Your snoring is your problem, also ear plugs don’t drown out freight trains they just don’t.. be considerate and don’t sleep in a dorm

    Reply
  123. Snoring is curable. It is NOT the right of a self-reporting OSA sufferer to enjoy dorm sleeping at the cost of unsuspecting roommates. Earplugs do nothing. Please reconsider your entitlement. I write this as I lie awake from the noise of not one, but TWO snoring women at this very moment.

    Reply
  124. Get a private room, CPAP or go fuck yourself. If I had to get vaxxed and give up a year of my life for the good of the collective, you (and the fucking POS snoring below me right now) need to stay the fuck out of hostel dorm rooms for the good of the collective.

    Reply
  125. I disagree, if the snoring exceeds what earplugs/music can tune out, the person needs to get a private room rather than impeding sleep for the others. Or hostels should have a snorers room

    Reply
  126. There’s a simple solution to this. Instead of staying in the communal dorm, stay in hostels that have private rooms. Yeah, you’ll pay more, but still cheaper than a hotel and other travelers will be spared your midnight trumpeting and you will be spared pissy looks and embarrassing breakfasts. Also, there *are* things you can do to address snoring. For one, you could have sleep apnea and that can be life threatening. If you snore that bad it definitely merits a sleep study to identify the cause. Just saying “accept the fact that I snore” isn’t a solution and is selfish because there are things that YOU can do to address the issue. Your fellow travelers can’t do a damn thing about your snoring, but you can.

    Reply
  127. Fucking bastard you start thay one greatest thing a human needs at the end of the day…a good night’s sleep for a hard day at work…a decent sleep without getting disturbed with these truck noises would be much appreciated. You sleep heavy and continuous without any disturbance. The others, like me who gets disturbed quite too much with it and who hasn’t been able to sleep for the past week just have one feeling..to oush a dagger through your fucking throat… That’s how annoyed you get when someone stalls that one nature’s greatest escape mechanism from you. Have some shame for justifying your flaw. Get it fixed or live in a truck garage.

    Reply
  128. Other people’s compassion for your medical condition does not entitle you to deprive them of their sleep and health, or to expose them to potential accidents that result from a lack of sleep. There are many people who make sacrifices and adjustments because of medical conditions — think of those who use wheelchairs — they will travel less or save enough money to enable them to book single rooms. Or people with a type of tourette’s syndrome that disrupts social situations. Snorers are obviously compromising other’s health and social relations. it’s time they admit to their ‘special needs’ status, have a sense of responsibility to others, and financially invest in appropriate treatments and adjustments — the way other ‘special needs’ people do. That said, people who can’t sleep in a dorm room have a responsibility to wake up the snorer for the sake of everyone else, and for the sake of the snorer, who can potentially get a stroke, a heart attack, gastroesophageal reflux, and choke in their sleep.

    Reply
  129. Hostels need to acknowledge snoring as a health and social hazard, and as noise pollution — and need to put remedies in place — like snorers’ rooms. And non-snorers should stop putting up with snorers — wake them up! Take turns waking them up, if you have to. They are the noise polluters, not you. If you are not polluting, you deserve to sleep. Polluters generally pay penalties for polluting — in their case, by having less sleep, or paying extra for a single room. It really ought to be that simple. If you are going to pollute — either you get a single room, or you sleep with other snorers. Hostel guests should not be snorer’s nurses, staying up all night so the snorers can sleep.

    Reply
  130. Let me be frank.

    You are a disgusting and selfish person.

    The fact that you think that your ‘side of the story’ is even relevant or interesting is a reflection of your selfishness.

    If you snore, you have no business in a hostel. You should be kicked out and be forced to pay the night for all the people who couldn’t sleep because of you.

    Reply
  131. I snore sometimes. I feel awful about it, and I never mind if someone gently asks me to turn over. I appreciate it, as it helps my throat and head feel a lot better in the morning if I’m not snoring all night. I would much prefer to stay in a room designated for snorers. I’ve not come across one yet though. My advice for now, carry several pairs of disposable ear plugs, inform your dorm mates in advance that you do snore, and offer eat plugs to anyone who would like them.

    Reply
  132. …Selfish pure entitlement. Separate dorms or stay in a single. You seem to want to be ignorant of how bad this is. Writing this on night 4 of sleep deprivation with only a few hours spent on night 3 in the hostel’s tv room, which is now sadly in use and not an option. Earplugs and music are useless. People going in and out are nothing buy comparison. But no, the sleep deprivation is making me sick and ruining a vacation. I have no energy to do things I wanted and am weak. People like you are incredibly inconsiderate and really add up.

    Reply
    • I feel you. Same situation here, had to pay an additional €70 to be moved to a single room because some fat slob like this Turtle idiot couldn’t care less about his problem and ruined my vacation. 4 nights without sleep, all of that because of some selfish sack of shit like this Australian loser.

      Reply
  133. It’s not your fault you snore but you also decided to choose a communal space knowing you snore loudly enough to keep people awake and that is your fault. At least warn people so they can maybe go get some earplugs if they didn’t have any. We can’t just pull them out of our asses.

    Reply
  134. If you snore then don’t sleep in a dorm..get a tent and sleep in the middle of a forest somewhere. It’s like if you stink of shit, don’t stand near other people…just go away and stay away forever. P.S. If you snore ask yourself why? Are you fat? Lose some weight it might solve the problem.

    Reply
  135. No it doesn’t work like that. If you know you have a snoring problem you should choose single rooms and respect other people’s rights to have a peaceful sleep. I am not paying €40 a night (that’s how much a bed in a hostel costs these days) to have some overweight dbag ruin my vacation. Stop thinking you’re the victim here

    Reply
  136. “ You have no right to be angry if someone snores in your hostel dorm room.” followed by “ You have the option of earplugs or music if things truly bother you that much.” Reading that is quite funny because that’s what is happening to me right now, and nothing is helping. Been trying to sleep for 3+ hours but one jackass has been snoring the entire time.

    How can this be solved? Easy solution: hostels should put all the snoring people in the same damn dorm. That way, more people will be able to have a good night sleep.

    Reply
  137. Smellly hippie can get kicked out from the hostel if it smells too much.
    Snorer can get kicked out too if it’s too much.
    There is right to do it and other non snorers have right to be angry since snoring is harming their health/mental health.
    Yes it’s shared room, so we should accept all kind of unwanted things from others? NO! we just should be aware and prepared to not be bothering others.
    If you can’t care about others, you have no right to stay in dormitory rooms.
    Snorers like you are just taking advantage.
    Your logic is very wrong.
    Be aware, don’t stay in dormitory please.

    Reply
    • Ok while the first half of this article did invoke some putty towards snorers the second half where you said that people have no right to be upset and that snoring is your Devine right absolutely did not. I’ve been in dorms of 15 people all awake because one person is snoring incredibly loud and it is fucking infuriating. There are options for snorers. You can buy a spray you put under your tongue you can get a surgery, you can avoid alcohol, lose weight, practice proper tongue posture. I know all of these because I’ve been up late at night googling when I should be sleeping because there’s a fucking snorers in my room but snorers never seem as concerned about finding a solution as the people who have to share a room with them and if all else fails stay in a private room, if you were able to find a girlfriend willing to share a room with you it’s not a whole lot more expensive but I’m assuming it’s difficult to find a girl willing to do that isn’t it??

      Reply
  138. I do not agree at all with you. You might be forgiven the first time, but you say you know that you are a snorer and you still stay in dorms. thats just disrespectful.

    Reply
  139. How conceited are you? Get your ego in check, Michael. It’s your job to do something about it if you are bothering everyone else, you inconsiderate moron. The world doesn’t revolve around you.

    Reply
  140. You shouldn’t be in a shared dorm if you snor, though. It’s inconsiderdate and just rude knowing you keep everyone else awake when you yourself have a peaceful night of sleep. Why can’t you move over to your own room?

    Reply
  141. If You are aware of the problem, why do you sleep in dorms? Why 10 people should suffer because one has sleeping disorder? I always use earplugs in communal areas but if someone is extremely loud, it won’t help.

    Reply
  142. That is bullshit. You should be mindful of other’s sleep too. It’s incredibly selfish to stay in a room full of others and disturb their sleep.

    Reply
  143. It’s funny how many people are complaining about snoring sleepers.

    Here is a simple fact: you CANNOT control who you sleep with in a hostel dorm room. Period. You have no idea who you are going to share the same room you are sleeping.

    Anyone who does not understand this fact should pick a personal room, not a shared room and yet still complaining.

    You can’t have best of the both world: privacy AND low price. Stop complaining because it looks really pathetic. Seriously

    Reply
  144. I bet about half (or more) of people who complaining about snoring here DO snore and yet they might not be aware of it yet. Snoring is extremely common and it is very likely YOU are snorer as well it without knowing it yourselves, especially when you are tired, drunk, etc.

    If you don’t like suffer from snoring, you need to get a private room because fundamental nature of the shared room idea is you share with strangers. You have NO control over who you share the room with. Isn’t it so fxxxing clear? I have no idea why these losers are whinning.

    Reply

Leave a comment