The power of love

Just what should you expect at Juliet’s House in Verona, Italy. Well… a lot of love, a lot of expressions of love, and some very clever marketing!

Written by Michael Turtle

Michael Turtle is the founder of Time Travel Turtle. He has been a journalist for more than 20 years and has travelled the world full time since 2011.

Michael Turtle is the founder of Time Travel Turtle and has been travelling full time for a decade.

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The House of Juliet, Verona, Italy

Love has an undeniable power. There’s a strength in the emotion that is indefinable and seems endless.

It’s so strong that it can defeat logic, neutralise rational thought and influence decisions. In other words, it’s exactly what salespeople are looking for.

Enter stage left, the House of Juliet in Verona. The brainchild of an Italian marketer, it is a money-spinner that only love could make so successful.

The House of Juliet, Verona, Italy

There’s a simple formula to making a fortune in this instance.

  1. Find one of history’s most enduring love stories. Romeo and Juliet – tick!
  2. Identify the city in which it is set. Verona, Italy – tick!
  3. Choose the most iconic location from this love story. Juliet’s balcony – tick!
  4. Locate an old building that needs some patronage from tourists – tick!
  5. Build a balcony – tick!
  6. Call it Juliet’s House – tick!
  7. Sit back and let the money roll in – disarm doors and cross-tick!
The House of Juliet, Verona, Italy

Letters to Juliet

There is absolutely no room to move in the courtyard at the House of Juliet. This isn’t even the height of summer but already it is full of tourists.

I’ve had to push my way through doting boyfriends, lovestruck girlfriends, indulgent husbands and adoring wives.

It’s as though they’re trying to be obstructionist and they’ve singled me out (pun intended).

The House of Juliet, Verona, Italy

Some choose to go inside the house for 6 euros each, mainly so they can take photos of each other on the balcony. Others have just come for a look but get sucked in by the merchandise and the cafes and shops in the courtyard.

Regardless, there’s a lot of money changing hands at a landmark that has nothing to do with its name.

The House of Juliet, Verona, Italy
The House of Juliet, Verona, Italy

Juliet’s House in Verona is a monument to love. The artists: thousands of people over many years who have left their mark on the walls and anyone else they can scribble.

They’ve written names inside hearts, affixed locks to a gate, and even stuck their mutually-chewed gums on every possible surface. Almost every space that could be covered is covered.

The House of Juliet, Verona, Italy
The House of Juliet, Verona, Italy

Didn’t I say that love neutralises rational thought?

Still, I understand that Verona is a romantic place and I’m not a complete grinch. So, here are a few suggestions for experiences that will get your heart racing:

 

15 thoughts on “The power of love”

  1. I stood on that balcony once. I was 15 and it was a million years ago, not really crowded and no love locks or other… stuff. Looks like it has taken off enormously.

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  2. I guess love is one of those overwhelming emotions so things that speak to that emotion resonate well and draw in people. I get that R&J is a great love story, but it ends so tragically. It always bothered me as a kid that it was so popular with such a tragic (and fully avoidable with communication) ending.

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    • Perhaps it should serve as a good example of why communication is important in any relationship. Although they didn’t have mobile phones back in those days so it wouldn’t have been as easy just to SMS each other.

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  3. Weren’t they smart to set up Juliet’s balcony? Shakespeare was smart to write such a saleable story too, somehow tragic love always has its appeal πŸ™‚

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  4. I completely love reading other blogs that are a bit cynical about Juliet’s balcony!

    I went there this year and it was hectic and horrible… just a bunch of people crammed into a small courtyard, trying to feel up a statue of Juliet (seriously, who was the first person to rub her breast for good luck, I hope the statue comes alive and gives him a good slap). I think Romeo and Juliet is a bit of a shallow romance, and Juliet’s balcony is an equally shallow tourist gimmick. But hey, at least it gives us something to write about! If you’re interested I wrote a blog on the balcony too (http://www.anxiousadventurers.com/juliets-house-verona-casa-di-giulietta/)

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